The Royal Proclamation of 1763 and the Aboriginal Constitution

In Terry Fenge and Jim Aldridge, eds., Keeping Promises: The Royal Proclamation of 1763, Aboriginal Rights, and Treaties in Canada (Montreal & Kingston: McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2015), 14-32, ISBN: 978-0-7735-4587-8

45 Pages Posted: 2 Apr 2019

See all articles by Brian Slattery

Brian Slattery

York University - Osgoode Hall Law School

Date Written: 2015

Abstract

In the Manitoba Metis Federation case, the Supreme Court of Canada identifies three major pillars of Aboriginal law: the Royal Proclamation of 1763, the Honour of the Crown, and Aboriginal Treaties. This paper argues that these three, taken together, make up the framework of the Aboriginal Constitution, which parallels the Federal Pact among the Provinces and provides the Constitution of Canada with its most ancient roots.

Keywords: Canadian constitutional law, Royal Proclamation of 1763, Honour of the Crown, Indigenous treaties, Aboriginal rights, Indigenous rights, History of Canada,

Suggested Citation

Slattery, Brian, The Royal Proclamation of 1763 and the Aboriginal Constitution (2015). In Terry Fenge and Jim Aldridge, eds., Keeping Promises: The Royal Proclamation of 1763, Aboriginal Rights, and Treaties in Canada (Montreal & Kingston: McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2015), 14-32, ISBN: 978-0-7735-4587-8, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3340293

Brian Slattery (Contact Author)

York University - Osgoode Hall Law School ( email )

4700 Keele Street
Toronto, Ontario M3J 1P3
Canada

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