WHEN BIG OBJECTS MEAN A SMALL SENSE OF OWNERSHIP

56 Pages Posted:

See all articles by Bernadette Kamleitner

Bernadette Kamleitner

Vienna University of Economics and Business - Department of Marketing

Sophie Suessenbach

WU Vienna

Date Written: January 28, 2018

Abstract

The size of a product is a key feature of its appearance and it also potentially affects object use. Six studies explore how size alienates even experienced consumers from objects when it affects perceptions of control over those objects. Findings from different product categories, acquisition and consumption stages, and laboratory and field data show that size-induced loss of control impedes the psychological bond between the product and the individual—i.e. psychological ownership— and eventually diminishes the managerially relevant allure of large objects. Notably, visual inspection alone does not give rise to this adverse effect of too-large sizes; it is contingent on physical engagement with an object. Moreover, we show that perceived control over an object is not only a function of the object’s size but also of the physical characteristic of the consumer engaging with it. Our results entail implications for product design, sales, and marketing communication.

Suggested Citation

Kamleitner, Bernadette and Suessenbach, Sophie, WHEN BIG OBJECTS MEAN A SMALL SENSE OF OWNERSHIP (January 28, 2018). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=

Bernadette Kamleitner (Contact Author)

Vienna University of Economics and Business - Department of Marketing ( email )

Austria

Sophie Suessenbach

WU Vienna ( email )

Welthandelsplatz 1 1
Wien, 1020
Austria

Register to save articles to
your library

Register

Paper statistics

Downloads
15
Abstract Views
66
PlumX Metrics