Universal Basic Income in the Developing World

32 Pages Posted: 4 Mar 2019

See all articles by Abhijit V. Banerjee

Abhijit V. Banerjee

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) - Department of Economics

Paul Niehaus

University of California, San Diego (UCSD)

Tavneet Suri

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) - Sloan School of Management

Multiple version iconThere are 2 versions of this paper

Date Written: February 2019

Abstract

Should developing countries give everyone enough money to live on? Interest in this idea has grown enormously in recent years, reflecting both positive results from a number of existing cash transfer programs and also dissatisfaction with the perceived limitations of piecemeal, targeted approaches to reducing extreme poverty. We discuss what we know (and what we do not) about three questions: what recipients would likely do with the incremental income, whether this would unlock further economic growth, and the potential consequences of giving the money to everyone (as opposed to targeting it).

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Suggested Citation

Banerjee, Abhijit V. and Niehaus, Paul and Suri, Tavneet, Universal Basic Income in the Developing World (February 2019). NBER Working Paper No. w25598. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3346217

Abhijit V. Banerjee (Contact Author)

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) - Department of Economics ( email )

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Paul Niehaus

University of California, San Diego (UCSD) ( email )

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United States

Tavneet Suri

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) - Sloan School of Management ( email )

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Cambridge, MA 02142
United States

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