Do Self-Reporting Regimes Matter? Evidence From the Convention Against Torture

International Studies Quarterly (2019, Forthcoming).

U of Penn Law School, Public Law Research Paper No. 19-16

48 Pages Posted: 5 Mar 2019

See all articles by Beth A. Simmons

Beth A. Simmons

University of Pennsylvania

Cosette D. Creamer

University of Minnesota - Twin Cities - Department of Political Science; University of Minnesota - Twin Cities - School of Law; Harvard University - Department of Government; Boston University School of Law

Multiple version iconThere are 2 versions of this paper

Date Written: January 11, 2019

Abstract

International regulatory agreements depend largely on self-reporting for implementation, yet we know almost nothing about whether or how such mechanisms work. We theorize that self-reporting processes provide information for domestic constituencies, with the potential to create pressure for better compliance. Using original data on state reports submitted to the Committee Against Torture, we demonstrate the influence of this process on the pervasiveness of torture and inhumane treatment. We illustrate the power of self-reporting regimes to mobilize domestic politics through evidence of civil society participation in shadow reporting, media attention, and legislative activity around anti-torture law and practice. This is the first study to evaluate systematically the effects of self-reporting in the context of a treaty regime on human rights outcomes. Since many international agreements rely predominantly on self-reporting, the results have broad significance for compliance with international regulatory regimes globally.

Keywords: international law, international politics, international legal norms, treaties, conventions, international agreements, international human rights, treaty implementation, treaty compliance, states parties, periodic review, international community

Suggested Citation

Simmons, Beth A. and Creamer, Cosette D., Do Self-Reporting Regimes Matter? Evidence From the Convention Against Torture (January 11, 2019). International Studies Quarterly (2019, Forthcoming).; U of Penn Law School, Public Law Research Paper No. 19-16. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3346591 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3346591

Beth A. Simmons (Contact Author)

University of Pennsylvania ( email )

3501Sansom
Philadelphia, PA 19104
United States
7817990076 (Phone)

Cosette D. Creamer

University of Minnesota - Twin Cities - Department of Political Science ( email )

1414 Social Sciences
267 19th Avenue South
Minneapolis, MN 55455
United States

University of Minnesota - Twin Cities - School of Law ( email )

229 19th Avenue South
Minneapolis, MN 55455
United States

Harvard University - Department of Government ( email )

1737 Cambridge St
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

Boston University School of Law ( email )

765 Commonwealth Avenue
Boston, MA 02215
United States

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