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Development of Human Infants’ Receptive Field Mechanisms in Visual Motion Processing

14 Pages Posted: 22 Mar 2019 Sneak Peek Status: Review Complete

See all articles by Yusuke Nakashima

Yusuke Nakashima

Chuo University - Research and Development Initiative

So Kanazawa

Japan Women’s University - Department of Psychology

Masami K. Yamaguchi

Chuo University - Department of Psychology

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Abstract

Motion direction of a large high-contrast pattern is more difficult to perceive than that of a small one [1]. This counterintuitive perceptual phenomenon is considered to reflect surround suppression, a receptive field property observed in the visual cortex [2-5]. Here, we demonstrate that this phenomenon can be observed in human infants. Infants at 7-8 months of age showed higher sensitivity for a small motion stimulus than for a large one. However, infants under 6 months showed the opposite result; motion sensitivity was higher for a large stimulus. These results suggest that suppressive surround regions beyond classical receptive fields develop in the second half of the first year. Moreover, we examined the size of receptive fields in infants using this phenomenon and found that the center region of receptive fields shrinks from 3 months to 8 months. Our findings suggest that receptive fields related to motion processing are broad and do not have extra-classical receptive fields in early infancy, and that they become narrower and acquire suppressive surround regions in the first year of life.

Keywords: visual development, motion perception, receptive field, surround suppression, human infant

Suggested Citation

Nakashima, Yusuke and Kanazawa, So and Yamaguchi, Masami K., Development of Human Infants’ Receptive Field Mechanisms in Visual Motion Processing (March 20, 2019). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3356838 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3356838
This is a paper under consideration at Cell Press and has not been peer-reviewed.

Yusuke Nakashima (Contact Author)

Chuo University - Research and Development Initiative ( email )

Tokyo
Japan

So Kanazawa

Japan Women’s University - Department of Psychology

Kanagawa
Japan

Masami K. Yamaguchi

Chuo University - Department of Psychology

Tokyo
Japan

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