Hating and Mating: Fears over Mate Competition and Violent Hate Crime against Refugees

58 Pages Posted: 24 Apr 2019

See all articles by Rafaela M. Dancygier

Rafaela M. Dancygier

Princeton University - Department of Political Science; Princeton University - Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs

Naoki Egami

Princeton University, Department of Politics

Amaney Jamal

Princeton University - Department of Political Science

Ramona Rischke

Humboldt University of Berlin - Berlin Institute for Integration and Migration Research

Date Written: March 23, 2019

Abstract

As the number of refugees rises across the world, anti-refugee violence has become a pressing concern. What explains the incidence and support of such hate crime? We argue that fears among native men that refugees pose a threat in the competition for female partners is a critical but understudied factor driving hate crime. Employing a comprehensive dataset on the incidence of hate crime across Germany, we first demonstrate that hate crime rises where men face disadvantages in local mating markets. Next, we deploy an original four-wave panel survey to confirm that support for hate crime increases when men fear that the inflow of refugees makes it more difficult to find female partners. Mate competition concerns remain a robust predictor even when controlling for anti-refugee views, perceived job competition, general frustration, and aggressiveness. We conclude that a more complete understanding of hate crime must incorporate mating markets and mate competition.

Keywords: hate crime, refugees, immigration, ethnocentrism, inter-group conflict, sex ratios, marriage markets

JEL Classification: D74, J11, J12, J15, N34

Suggested Citation

Dancygier, Rafaela M. and Egami, Naoki and Jamal, Amaney and Rischke, Ramona, Hating and Mating: Fears over Mate Competition and Violent Hate Crime against Refugees (March 23, 2019). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3358780 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3358780

Rafaela M. Dancygier (Contact Author)

Princeton University - Department of Political Science ( email )

Princeton, NJ 08544-1013
United States
609-258-4807 (Phone)

Princeton University - Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs ( email )

Princeton University
Princeton, NJ 08544-1021
United States

Naoki Egami

Princeton University, Department of Politics ( email )

Princeton, NJ
United States

Amaney Jamal

Princeton University - Department of Political Science ( email )

Corwin Hall
Princeton, NJ 08544-1013
United States

Ramona Rischke

Humboldt University of Berlin - Berlin Institute for Integration and Migration Research ( email )

Mohrenstra├če, 40-41
Germany

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