PACs and Super PACs: Measuring the Changing Nature of Corruption Behavior

23 Pages Posted: 25 Apr 2019

See all articles by Neal Willcott

Neal Willcott

Queen's University (Canada), Queen's School of Business

Alex Faseruk

Memorial University of Newfoundland (MNU) - Faculty of Business Administration

Date Written: March 29, 2019

Abstract

Corruption behavior has been notoriously difficult to observe despite its illegal nature and importance to firms and society both economically and politically. Frequently, in empirical research, proxies for corruption are generated. A popular proxy used, as in Smith (2016), is corruption convictions. This study extends Smith’s analysis by examining data from 1998-2016, applying Smith’s shielding and liquidity hypotheses to the current study. This study finds with an updated dataset that the shielding hypothesis is supported; however, corruption convictions do not exhibit significance in the regression model. This study discusses the implications of the latter result and underscores the need for future research and more comprehensive models to examine corruption

Keywords: Super PACs, PACs, Corruption

Suggested Citation

Willcott, Neal and Faseruk, Alex, PACs and Super PACs: Measuring the Changing Nature of Corruption Behavior (March 29, 2019). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3359069 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3359069

Neal Willcott (Contact Author)

Queen's University (Canada), Queen's School of Business ( email )

Kingston, Ontario
Canada

Alex Faseruk

Memorial University of Newfoundland (MNU) - Faculty of Business Administration ( email )

St. John's, Newfoundland A1B 3X5
Canada

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