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Systematic Comparison of Methods for Determining the in vivo Biodistribution of Porous Nanostructured Injectable Inorganic Particles

35 Pages Posted: 28 Mar 2019 First Look: Accepted

See all articles by Sara Nizzero

Sara Nizzero

Houston Methodist Research Institute - Department of Nanomedicine; Rice University - Applied Physics Graduate Program

Feng Li

Houston Methodist Research Institute - Department of Nanomedicine

Guodong Zhang

Houston Methodist Research Institute - Department of Nanomedicine

Alessandro Venuta

Houston Methodist Research Institute - Department of Nanomedicine

Carlotta Borsoi

Houston Methodist Research Institute - Department of Nanomedicine

Junhua Mai

Houston Methodist Research Institute - Department of Nanomedicine

Haifa Shen

Houston Methodist Research Institute - Department of Nanomedicine; Weill Cornell Medical College - Department of Cell and Developmental Biology

Joy Wolfram

Houston Methodist Research Institute - Department of Nanomedicine

Zheng Li

Houston Methodist Research Institute - Department of Nanomedicine

Elvin Blanco

Houston Methodist Research Institute - Department of Nanomedicine

Mauro Ferrari

Houston Methodist Research Institute - Department of Nanomedicine; Weill Cornell Medical College - Department of Medicine

Abstract

With a wide variety of biodistribution measurement techniques reported in the literature, it is important to perform side-by-side comparisons of results obtained with different methods on the same particle platform, to determine differences across methods, highlight advantages and disadvantages, and inform methods selection according to specific applications. Inorganic nanostructured particles (INPs) have gained a central role in the development of injectable delivery vectors thanks to their controllable design, biocompatibility, and favorable degradation kinetic. Thus, accurate determination of in vivo biodistribution of INPs is a key aspect of developing and optimizing this class of delivery vectors. In this study, a systematic comparison of spectroscopy (inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy), fluorescence (in vivo imaging system, confocal microscopy, and plate reader), and radiolabeling (gamma counter)-based techniques is performed to assess the accuracy and sensitivity of biodistribution measurements in mice. Each method is evaluated on porous silicon particles, an established and versatile injectable delivery platform. Biodistribution is evaluated in all major organs and compared in terms of absolute results (%ID/g and %ID/organ when possible) and sensitivity (σ%). Finally, we discuss how these results can be extended to inform method selection for other platforms and specific applications, with an outlook to potential benefit for pre-clinical and clinical studies. Overall, this study presents a new practical guide for selection of in vivo biodistribution methods that yield quantitative results.

Keywords: biodistribution, ICP-OES, imaging, injectable particles, fluorescence labeling, radiolabeling

Suggested Citation

Nizzero, Sara and Li, Feng and Zhang, Guodong and Venuta, Alessandro and Borsoi, Carlotta and Mai, Junhua and Shen, Haifa and Wolfram, Joy and Li, Zheng and Blanco, Elvin and Ferrari, Mauro, Systematic Comparison of Methods for Determining the in vivo Biodistribution of Porous Nanostructured Injectable Inorganic Particles (March 26, 2019). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3360264

Sara Nizzero

Houston Methodist Research Institute - Department of Nanomedicine

6670 Bertner Ave
Houston, TX 77030
United States

Rice University - Applied Physics Graduate Program

6100 South Main Street
Houston, TX 77005-1892
United States

Feng Li

Houston Methodist Research Institute - Department of Nanomedicine

6670 Bertner Ave
Houston, TX 77030
United States

Guodong Zhang

Houston Methodist Research Institute - Department of Nanomedicine

6670 Bertner Ave
Houston, TX 77030
United States

Alessandro Venuta

Houston Methodist Research Institute - Department of Nanomedicine

6670 Bertner Ave
Houston, TX 77030
United States

Carlotta Borsoi

Houston Methodist Research Institute - Department of Nanomedicine

6670 Bertner Ave
Houston, TX 77030
United States

Junhua Mai

Houston Methodist Research Institute - Department of Nanomedicine

6670 Bertner Ave
Houston, TX 77030
United States

Haifa Shen

Houston Methodist Research Institute - Department of Nanomedicine

6670 Bertner Ave
Houston, TX 77030
United States

Weill Cornell Medical College - Department of Cell and Developmental Biology

1300 York Avenue
P.O. Box 24144
New York, NY 10065
United States

Joy Wolfram

Houston Methodist Research Institute - Department of Nanomedicine

6670 Bertner Ave
Houston, TX 77030
United States

Zheng Li

Houston Methodist Research Institute - Department of Nanomedicine

6670 Bertner Ave
Houston, TX 77030
United States

Elvin Blanco

Houston Methodist Research Institute - Department of Nanomedicine

6670 Bertner Ave
Houston, TX 77030
United States

Mauro Ferrari (Contact Author)

Houston Methodist Research Institute - Department of Nanomedicine ( email )

6670 Bertner Ave
Houston, TX 77030
United States

Weill Cornell Medical College - Department of Medicine ( email )

1300 York Avenue
P.O. Box 24144
New York, NY 10065
United States

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