Schools, Neighborhoods, and the Long-Run Effect of Crime-Prone Peers

53 Pages Posted: 8 Apr 2019

See all articles by Stephen B. Billings

Stephen B. Billings

University of Colorado - Boulder

Mark Hoekstra

Texas A&M University - Department of Economics; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Date Written: April 2019

Abstract

This paper examines how elementary-aged peers affect cognitive and non-cognitive outcomes from adolescence to adulthood. We identify effects by exploiting within-school and within-neighborhood variation in the proportion of peers with an arrested parent. Results indicate exposure to these peers reduces achievement and increases antisocial behavior during middle and high school. More importantly, we estimate that a five percentage point increase in school and neighborhood crime-prone peers increases arrest rates at age 19 - 21 by 6.5 and 2.6 percent, respectively. Additional evidence suggests these effects are due to attending school with crime-prone peers, rather than living in the same neighborhood.

Institutional subscribers to the NBER working paper series, and residents of developing countries may download this paper without additional charge at www.nber.org.

Suggested Citation

Billings, Stephen B. and Hoekstra, Mark, Schools, Neighborhoods, and the Long-Run Effect of Crime-Prone Peers (April 2019). NBER Working Paper No. w25730. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3368020

Stephen B. Billings (Contact Author)

University of Colorado - Boulder ( email )

Leeds School of Business
Koelbel Building
Boulder, CO US 80309
United States

Mark Hoekstra

Texas A&M University - Department of Economics ( email )

5201 University Blvd.
College Station, TX 77843-4228
United States

National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) ( email )

1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

Register to save articles to
your library

Register

Paper statistics

Downloads
6
Abstract Views
25
PlumX Metrics