Modulation of Foreign Body Reaction Against PDMS Implant by Grafting Topographically Different Poly(Acrylic Acid) Micropatterns

39 Pages Posted: 8 Apr 2019

See all articles by Jae Sang Lee

Jae Sang Lee

Yonsei University - Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering

Byung Ho Shin

Seoul National University - Department of Biomedical Science

Byoung Yong Yoo

Yonsei University - Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering

Sun-Young Nam

Seoul National University - Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery

Miji Lee

Seoul National University - Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery

Hansoo Park

Chung-Ang University - School of Integrative Engineering

Young Bin Choy

Seoul National University - Department of Biomedical Science; Seoul National University - Interdisciplinary Program for Bioengineering; Seoul National University - Institute of Medicine & Biological Engineering

Chan Yeong Heo

Seoul National University - Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery; Seoul National University - Department of Biomedical Science; Seoul National University - Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery

Won-Gun Koh

Yonsei University - Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering

Date Written: April 8, 2019

Abstract

The surface of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) was grafted with poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) layers via surface-initiated photopolymerization to suppress the capsular contracture resulting from a foreign body reaction. Owing to the nature of photo-induced polymerization, various PAA micropatterns could be fabricated using photolithography. Hole and stripe micropatterns approximately 100-μm wide and 3-μm thick were grafted onto the PDMS surface without delamination. The incorporation of PAA micropatterns provided not only chemical cues by hydrophilic PAA microdomains but also topographical cues by hole or stripe micropatterns. In vitro studies revealed that a PAA-grafted PDMS surface had a lower proliferation of both macrophages and fibroblasts regardless of the pattern presence. However, PDMS with PAA micropatterns, especially stripe micropatterns, minimized the aggregation of fibroblasts and their subsequent differentiation into myofibroblasts. An in vivo study also showed that PDMS samples with stripe micropatterns polarized macrophages into anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages and most effectively inhibited capsular contracture, which was demonstrated by investigating the inflammation score, transforming-growth-factor-β expression, number of macrophages, and myofibroblasts as well as the collagen density and capsule thickness.

Keywords: Capsular contracture, Foreign body reaction, Photo-induced grafting, Poly(acrylic acid) layer, Micropatterns

Suggested Citation

Lee, Jae Sang and Shin, Byung Ho and Yoo, Byoung Yong and Nam, Sun-Young and Lee, Miji and Park, Hansoo and Choy, Young Bin and Heo, Chan Yeong and Koh, Won-Gun, Modulation of Foreign Body Reaction Against PDMS Implant by Grafting Topographically Different Poly(Acrylic Acid) Micropatterns (April 8, 2019). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3368362

Jae Sang Lee (Contact Author)

Yonsei University - Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering

Seoul, 03722
Korea, Republic of (South Korea)

Byung Ho Shin

Seoul National University - Department of Biomedical Science

1 Gwanak-ro
Gwanak-gu
Seoul, 03080
Korea, Republic of (South Korea)

Byoung Yong Yoo

Yonsei University - Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering

Seoul, 03722
Korea, Republic of (South Korea)

Sun-Young Nam

Seoul National University - Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery

Seoul, 13620
Korea, Republic of (South Korea)

Miji Lee

Seoul National University - Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery

Seoul, 13620
Korea, Republic of (South Korea)

Hansoo Park

Chung-Ang University - School of Integrative Engineering

Seoul
Korea, Republic of (South Korea)

Young Bin Choy

Seoul National University - Department of Biomedical Science

1 Gwanak-ro
Gwanak-gu
Seoul, 03080
Korea, Republic of (South Korea)

Seoul National University - Interdisciplinary Program for Bioengineering

Seoul
Korea, Republic of (South Korea)

Seoul National University - Institute of Medicine & Biological Engineering

Seoul, 03080
Korea, Republic of (South Korea)

Chan Yeong Heo

Seoul National University - Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery ( email )

Seoul, 13620
Korea, Republic of (South Korea)

Seoul National University - Department of Biomedical Science ( email )

1 Gwanak-ro
Gwanak-gu
Seoul, 03080
Korea, Republic of (South Korea)

Seoul National University - Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery ( email )

Seoul, 03080
Korea, Republic of (South Korea)

Won-Gun Koh

Yonsei University - Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering ( email )

Seoul, 03722
Korea, Republic of (South Korea)

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