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Accumulation-Driven Surfactant-Free Synthesis of Architectured Immiscible Metallic Nanoalloys with Enhanced Catalysis

41 Pages Posted: 16 Apr 2019 Sneak Peek Status: Review Complete

See all articles by Bharath Bangalore Rajeeva

Bharath Bangalore Rajeeva

University of Texas at Austin - Materials Science and Engineering Program

Pranaw Kunal

University of Texas at Austin - Department of Chemistry

Pavana Siddhartha Kollipara

University of Texas at Austin - Walker Department of Mechanical Engineering

Palash V. Acharya

University of Texas at Austin - Walker Department of Mechanical Engineering

Minwoong Joe

University of Texas at Austin - Materials Science and Engineering Program

Matthew S. Ide

ExxonMobil Research and Engineering Company

Karalee Jarvis

University of Texas at Austin - Texas Materials Institute

Yuanyue Liu

University of Texas at Austin - Materials Science and Engineering Program; University of Texas at Austin - Walker Department of Mechanical Engineering

Vaibhav Bahadur

University of Texas at Austin - Walker Department of Mechanical Engineering

Simon M. Humphrey

University of Texas at Austin - Department of Chemistry

Yuebing Zheng

University of Texas at Austin - Materials Science and Engineering Program; University of Texas at Austin - Walker Department of Mechanical Engineering; University of Texas at Austin - Texas Materials Institute

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Abstract

Accumulation-mediated chemical reactions are a ubiquitous phenomenon in nature. Herein, we explore microbubble-induced accumulation of precursor ions to achieve surfactant-free synthesis of immiscible metallic nanoalloys and to simultaneously pattern the nanoalloys into targeted architectures for their enhanced catalytic applications. We name our approach as a unified spatiotemporal synthesis and structuring (US3) strategy, wherein millisecond-scale accumulation of the precursor ions in a highly confined laser-mediated microbubble trap (MBT) drives ultra-fast alloy synthesis in sync with the structuring process. As a case-in-point, we employ US3 strategy for the in-situ surfactant-free synthesis and patterning of traditionally immiscible rhodium-gold (RhAu) nanoalloys. Stochastic random walk simulations justify the millisecond-scale accumulation process, leading to a 3-order reduction in synthesis time. The catalytic activity and structure-property relationship of the structured nanoalloys were evaluated using the reduction of p-nitrophenol with NaBH4. Our in-situ synthesis and structuring strategy can be translated for high-throughput production and screening of multi-metallic systems with tailored catalytic, opto-electronic, and magnetic functions.

Keywords: Immiscible Nanoalloys, Accumulation-mediated reactions, in-situ synthesis, Printed Catalysts, Rhodium Gold, Supersaturation, Random Walk Simulations

Suggested Citation

Rajeeva, Bharath Bangalore and Kunal, Pranaw and Kollipara, Pavana Siddhartha and Acharya, Palash V. and Joe, Minwoong and Ide, Matthew S. and Jarvis, Karalee and Liu, Yuanyue and Bahadur, Vaibhav and Humphrey, Simon M. and Zheng, Yuebing, Accumulation-Driven Surfactant-Free Synthesis of Architectured Immiscible Metallic Nanoalloys with Enhanced Catalysis (April 16, 2019). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3372970 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3372970
This is a paper under consideration at Cell Press and has not been peer-reviewed.

Bharath Bangalore Rajeeva

University of Texas at Austin - Materials Science and Engineering Program

United States

Pranaw Kunal

University of Texas at Austin - Department of Chemistry

United States

Pavana Siddhartha Kollipara

University of Texas at Austin - Walker Department of Mechanical Engineering

United States

Palash V. Acharya

University of Texas at Austin - Walker Department of Mechanical Engineering

United States

Minwoong Joe

University of Texas at Austin - Materials Science and Engineering Program

United States

Matthew S. Ide

ExxonMobil Research and Engineering Company

United States

Karalee Jarvis

University of Texas at Austin - Texas Materials Institute

United States

Yuanyue Liu

University of Texas at Austin - Materials Science and Engineering Program

United States

University of Texas at Austin - Walker Department of Mechanical Engineering

United States

Vaibhav Bahadur

University of Texas at Austin - Walker Department of Mechanical Engineering

United States

Simon M. Humphrey

University of Texas at Austin - Department of Chemistry ( email )

United States

Yuebing Zheng (Contact Author)

University of Texas at Austin - Materials Science and Engineering Program ( email )

United States

University of Texas at Austin - Walker Department of Mechanical Engineering ( email )

United States

University of Texas at Austin - Texas Materials Institute ( email )

United States

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