Transport, Utilization and Storage of CO2 Emissions Produced by Cement Industry: CCUS Study of the CLEANKER Project

9 Pages Posted: 26 Apr 2019

See all articles by Alla Shogenova

Alla Shogenova

Tallinn University of Technology; Tallinn University of Technology

Mai Uibu

Tallinn University of Technology (TUT) - Department of Materials and Environmental Technology

Daniela Gastaldi

Buzzi Unicem

Kazbulat Shogenov

Tallinn University of Technology, Department of Geology (TalTech DG)

Fulvio Canonico

Buzzi Unicem

Andres Trikkel

Tallinn University of Technology (TUT) - Department of Materials and Environmental Technology

Rein Kuusik

Tallinn University of Technology (TUT) - Department of Materials and Environmental Technology

Jüri Ivask

Tallinn University of Technology (TUT) - Department of Geology

Giovanni Cinti

C.T.G SpA

Karl Simmer

Tallinn University of Technology (TUT) - Department of Geology

Date Written: April 26, 2019

Abstract

The EU Horizon 2020 project CLEANKER is aimed on Ca-looping capture of CO2 emissions produced by cement industry. For the first time capture-focused EU project includes the full CCUS value chain study. This study includes techno-economic modelling of CO2 transport, storage, and utilization scenarios; CCUS regulatory issues; definition of BUZZI and ITC-HCG cement plants suitable for first-of-a-kind CCS plant based on transport and storage opportunities; mineral trapping of CO2 from the demo system and testing the carbonated materials for reuse in concrete.

Gaps in national regulations were analysed for Italy, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania and Russia involved in two planned CCUS scenarios (Italian and Baltic). Russia is one of the largest emitters and Estonia has one of the highest CO2 emissions per capita in the world. Russia has not ratified yet Paris Climate Agreement. Latvia, Lithuania and Russia are not parties of the London Protocol. CO2 use options in these countries include CO2 use for EOR, Geothermal Energy Recovery and mineral carbonation using waste materials. Additional CCUS regulations and political incentives are needed in these countries. Estonian burnt oil shale could be used as an effective sorbent in the proposed CO2-mineralization process, binding up to 0.18 kg CO2 per kg of waste. The onshore CCUS scenario was proposed for CO2 emissions produced and captured by Kunda Nordic Cement plant (KNC), Eesti and Balti power plants, and Latvenergo TEC-2, the largest CO2 emitters in Estonia and Latvia. CCUS scenario includes mineral carbonation of 1.2 mln tonnes CO2 and transport and storage of about 10 mln tonnes annually into North- Blidene and Blidene structures in the western Latvia. The average optimistic capacity of the structures (297 Mt CO2) will allow to store these emissions for at least 29.5 years. The share of the Estonian emissions stored in Latvia will be about 92.6%, including 5.6% by KNC. Latvian stored emissions will compose 7.4%. Such scenario will support Estonia and Latvia to reach their climate strategic targets. Techno-economic modelling of this scenario will be the next step of this study. Utilizing of the re-carbonated wastes in concrete application supports closing the CO2 cycle of Vernasca cement plant by trapping the carbon dioxide into a concrete that contains the cement of the same plant.

Keywords: CO2 emissions; Cement plant, CCUS regulations; CO2 mineral carbonation; oil shale ash; CCUS scenario; CO2 storage, GHGT-14

Suggested Citation

Shogenova, Alla and Uibu, Mai and Gastaldi, Daniela and Shogenov, Kazbulat and Canonico, Fulvio and Trikkel, Andres and Kuusik, Rein and Ivask, Jüri and Cinti, Giovanni and Simmer, Karl, Transport, Utilization and Storage of CO2 Emissions Produced by Cement Industry: CCUS Study of the CLEANKER Project (April 26, 2019). 14th Greenhouse Gas Control Technologies Conference Melbourne 21-26 October 2018 (GHGT-14). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3378578 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3378578

Alla Shogenova (Contact Author)

Tallinn University of Technology ( email )

Ehitajate tee 5
Tallinn, 19086
Estonia
+372 56644668 (Phone)

Tallinn University of Technology ( email )

Ehitajate tee 5
Tallinn, 19086
Estonia
+372 56644668 (Phone)

Mai Uibu

Tallinn University of Technology (TUT) - Department of Materials and Environmental Technology ( email )

Ehitajate tee 5
Tallinn, 19086
Estonia

Daniela Gastaldi

Buzzi Unicem

15033 Casale Monferrato
Alessandria
Italy

Kazbulat Shogenov

Tallinn University of Technology, Department of Geology (TalTech DG) ( email )

Ehitajate tee 5
Tallinn, 19086
Estonia
+3725589001 (Phone)

Fulvio Canonico

Buzzi Unicem

15033 Casale Monferrato
Alessandria
Italy

Andres Trikkel

Tallinn University of Technology (TUT) - Department of Materials and Environmental Technology

Ehitajate tee 5
Tallinn, 19086
Estonia

Rein Kuusik

Tallinn University of Technology (TUT) - Department of Materials and Environmental Technology

Ehitajate tee 5
Tallinn, 19086
Estonia

Jüri Ivask

Tallinn University of Technology (TUT) - Department of Geology

Ehitajate tee 5
Tallinn, 19086
Estonia

Giovanni Cinti

C.T.G SpA

Italy

Karl Simmer

Tallinn University of Technology (TUT) - Department of Geology

Ehitajate tee 5
Tallinn, 19086
Estonia

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