Keynes’s Philosophy of Mathematics Can’t Be Mastered by Reading the Notes of His Economics Lectures Made by His Students in the Years 1932–35

35 Pages Posted: 2 Jun 2019

See all articles by Michael Emmett Brady

Michael Emmett Brady

California State University, Dominguez Hills

Date Written: May 9, 2019

Abstract

J M Keynes’s approach to the use of mathematics is based on his interactions with Bertrand Russell, Alfred North Whitehead, William Ernest Johnson, C. D. Broad, G. E. Moore, and Alfred Marshall. His views were carefully expressed in the A Treatise on Probability and General Theory. Keynes favored using systems of simultaneous equations both in the A Treatise on Probability and General Theory. A study of the student notes taken in the years from 1932 to 1935 alone will lead to the wrong answer regarding Keynes’s views on the role of mathematics and systems of equations in economics. Keynes’s philosophy can be expressed by the term Inexact Measurement or Approximation, which Keynes made the foundation for his inexact approach to measurement in probability, mathematics, and statistics.

Keywords: Russell, Johnson, Mathematics, Moore, Whitehead, Philosophy, Student Notes

JEL Classification: B10, B12, B14, B16, B20, B22

Suggested Citation

Brady, Michael Emmett, Keynes’s Philosophy of Mathematics Can’t Be Mastered by Reading the Notes of His Economics Lectures Made by His Students in the Years 1932–35 (May 9, 2019). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3385726 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3385726

Michael Emmett Brady (Contact Author)

California State University, Dominguez Hills ( email )

1000 E. Victoria Street, Carson, CA
Carson, CA 90747
United States

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