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The Blood Compatibility Challenge. Part 4: Surface Modification for Hemocompatible Materials: Passive and Active Approaches to Guide Blood-Material Interactions

27 Pages Posted: 14 May 2019 First Look: Accepted

See all articles by Manfred F. Maitz

Manfred F. Maitz

Leibniz-Institut für Polymerforschung Dresden, Max Bergmann Center of Biomaterials, Institute Biofunctional Polymer Materials

M. Cristina L. Martins

Universidade do Porto - Instituto de Investigação e Inovação em Saúde - i3S; Universidade do Porto - Instituto de Engenharia Biomédica (INEB); Universidade do Porto - Institute of Biomedical Sciences Abel Salazar (ICBAS)

Niels Grabow

Universitätsmedizin Rostock - Institut für Biomedizinische Technik

Claudia Matschegewski

Universitätsmedizin Rostock - Institut für Biomedizinische Technik; Universitätsmedizin Rostock - Institute for ImplantTechnology and Biomaterials (IIB)

Nan Huang

Southwest Jiaotong University - Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Materials of Education Ministry

Elliot L. Chaikof

Harvard University - Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center; Harvard University - Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering; Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) - Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology

Mário A. Barbosa

Universidade do Porto - Instituto de Investigação e Inovação em Saúde - i3S; Universidade do Porto - Instituto de Engenharia Biomédica (INEB); Universidade do Porto - Institute of Biomedical Sciences Abel Salazar (ICBAS)

Carsten Werner

Leibniz-Institut für Polymerforschung Dresden, Max Bergmann Center of Biomaterials, Institute Biofunctional Polymer Materials

Claudia Sperling

Leibniz-Institut für Polymerforschung Dresden, Max Bergmann Center of Biomaterials, Institute Biofunctional Polymer Materials

Abstract

Biomedical devices in the blood flow disturb the fine-tuned balance of pro- and anti-coagulant factors in blood and vessel wall. Numerous technologies have been suggested to reduce coagulant and inflammatory responses of the body towards the device material, ranging from camouflage effects to permanent activity and further to a responsive interaction with the host systems. However, not all types of modification are suitable for all types of medical products.This review has a focus on application-oriented considerations of hemocompatible surface fittings. Thus, passive versus bioactive modifications are discussed along with the control of protein adsorption, stability of the immobilization, and the type of bioactive substance,biological or synthetic. Further considerations are related to the target system, whether enzymes or cells should be addressed in arterial or venous system, or whether the blood vessel wall is addressed. Recent developments like feedback controlled or self-renewing systems for drug release or addressing cellular regulation pathways of blood platelets and endothelial cells are paradigms for a generation of blood contacting devices, which are hemocompatible by cooperation with the host system.

Keywords: hemocompatibility, surface modification, coagulation, blood platelets, passivation, bioactive coating

Suggested Citation

Maitz, Manfred F. and Martins, M. Cristina L. and Grabow, Niels and Matschegewski, Claudia and Huang, Nan and Chaikof, Elliot L. and Barbosa, Mário A. and Werner, Carsten and Sperling, Claudia, The Blood Compatibility Challenge. Part 4: Surface Modification for Hemocompatible Materials: Passive and Active Approaches to Guide Blood-Material Interactions (May 14, 2019). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3387675

Manfred F. Maitz (Contact Author)

Leibniz-Institut für Polymerforschung Dresden, Max Bergmann Center of Biomaterials, Institute Biofunctional Polymer Materials

Dresden
Germany

M. Cristina L. Martins

Universidade do Porto - Instituto de Investigação e Inovação em Saúde - i3S

Rua Alfredo Allen, 208
Porto
Portugal

Universidade do Porto - Instituto de Engenharia Biomédica (INEB)

Rua Alfredo Allen
Porto
Portugal

Universidade do Porto - Institute of Biomedical Sciences Abel Salazar (ICBAS)

Rua Dr. Roberto Frias
4200-464 Porto
Portugal

Niels Grabow

Universitätsmedizin Rostock - Institut für Biomedizinische Technik

Friedrich-Barnewitz-Str.
Rostock
Germany

Claudia Matschegewski

Universitätsmedizin Rostock - Institut für Biomedizinische Technik

Friedrich-Barnewitz-Str.
Rostock
Germany

Universitätsmedizin Rostock - Institute for ImplantTechnology and Biomaterials (IIB)

Friedrich-Barnewitz-Str.
Rostock
Germany

Nan Huang

Southwest Jiaotong University - Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Materials of Education Ministry

Chengdu
China

Elliot L. Chaikof

Harvard University - Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

330 Brookline Avenue
Boston, MA 02115
United States

Harvard University - Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering

3 Blackfan Circle
Center for Life Science Bldg.
Boston, MA 02115
United States

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) - Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology

United States

Mário A. Barbosa

Universidade do Porto - Instituto de Investigação e Inovação em Saúde - i3S

Rua Alfredo Allen, 208
Porto
Portugal

Universidade do Porto - Instituto de Engenharia Biomédica (INEB)

Rua Alfredo Allen
Porto
Portugal

Universidade do Porto - Institute of Biomedical Sciences Abel Salazar (ICBAS)

Rua Dr. Roberto Frias
4200-464 Porto
Portugal

Carsten Werner

Leibniz-Institut für Polymerforschung Dresden, Max Bergmann Center of Biomaterials, Institute Biofunctional Polymer Materials

Dresden
Germany

Claudia Sperling

Leibniz-Institut für Polymerforschung Dresden, Max Bergmann Center of Biomaterials, Institute Biofunctional Polymer Materials

Dresden
Germany

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