Brother or Invaders? How Crisis-Driven Migrants Shape Voting Behavior

53 Pages Posted: 17 Jun 2019 Last revised: 18 Jul 2019

See all articles by Sandra Rozo

Sandra Rozo

University of Southern California - Marshall School of Business; University of Southern California - Schaeffer Center for Health Policy and Economics

Juan F. Vargas

Universidad del Rosario

Date Written: June 7, 2019

Abstract

What explains voters' negative attitudes toward immigration? Self-interested voters care about their personal economic and social circumstances. Sociotropic voters display in-group bias and perceive migrants as threats to their customs and culture. We study the electoral effects of forced internal and international migration in Colombia to provide evidence on the relative importance of these two hypotheses. We exploit the fact that migrants disproportionally locate in places with earlier settlements of people from their place of origin. In line with the sociotropic hypothesis, we find that only international migration inflows increase political participation and shift votes from left- to right-wing ideologies. Also consistent with the sociotropic hypothesis, we show that these results are not accounted for by the observed changes caused by migration inflows on socioeconomic variables.

Keywords: immigration, electoral outcomes, political economy

JEL Classification: D72, F2, O15, R23

Suggested Citation

Rozo, Sandra and Vargas, Juan F., Brother or Invaders? How Crisis-Driven Migrants Shape Voting Behavior (June 7, 2019). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3401036 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3401036

Sandra Rozo (Contact Author)

University of Southern California - Marshall School of Business ( email )

701 Exposition Blvd
Los Angeles, CA 90089
United States

HOME PAGE: http://www.sandravrozo.com

University of Southern California - Schaeffer Center for Health Policy and Economics ( email )

635 Downey Way
Los Angeles, CA 90089-3333
United States

Juan F. Vargas

Universidad del Rosario ( email )

Calle 12 No. 6-25
Bogota, DC
Colombia

Register to save articles to
your library

Register

Paper statistics

Downloads
3
Abstract Views
32
PlumX Metrics