The Slave Trade and Conflict in Africa, 1400-2000

46 Pages Posted: 26 Jun 2019

See all articles by Levi Boxell

Levi Boxell

Stanford University

John T. Dalton

Wake Forest University

Tin Cheuk Leung

Wake Forest University

Date Written: June 13, 2019

Abstract

Can the slave trade explain Africa's propensity for conflict? Using variation in slave exports driven by the interaction between foreign demand shocks and heterogeneity in trade costs, we show that the slave trade increased conflict propensities in pre-colonial Africa and that this effect has persisted to the present. Moreover, we find empirical evidence suggesting two related mechanisms for this persistence --- natural resources and national institutions. These results "decompress" history by connecting the short-run and long-run effects of the African slave trade.

Keywords: Slave Trade, Conflict, Resource Curse, Institutions, Africa

JEL Classification: N47, N57, O13, O43, P48, Q34

Suggested Citation

Boxell, Levi and Dalton, John T. and Leung, Tin Cheuk, The Slave Trade and Conflict in Africa, 1400-2000 (June 13, 2019). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3403796 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3403796

Levi Boxell

Stanford University ( email )

Stanford, CA
United States

John T. Dalton (Contact Author)

Wake Forest University ( email )

Winston-Salem, NC 27109
United States

HOME PAGE: http://www.wfu.edu/~daltonjt

Tin Cheuk Leung

Wake Forest University ( email )

Winston-Salem, NC 27109
United States

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