Teaching with Feminist Judgments: A Global Conversation

59 Pages Posted: 26 Jun 2019 Last revised: 2 Aug 2019

See all articles by Bridget J. Crawford

Bridget J. Crawford

Pace University School of Law

Kathryn Stanchi

University of Nevada, Las Vegas, William S. Boyd School of Law

Linda L. Berger

University of Nevada, Las Vegas, William S. Boyd School of Law

Gabrielle J. Appleby

University of New South Wales (UNSW)

Susan Frelich Appleton

Washington University in St. Louis - School of Law

Ross Astoria

University of Wisconsin - Parkside

Sharon Cowan

University of Edinburgh - School of Law

Rosalind Dixon

University of New South Wales (UNSW) - Faculty of Law

Troy Lavers

Leicester Law School

Andrea L. McArdle

CUNY School of Law

Elisabeth McDonald

University of Canterbury

Teri A. McMurtry-Chubb

The John Marshall Law School ; Mercer University - Walter F. George School of Law

Vanessa Munro

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Pam Wilkins

University of Detroit Mercy School of Law

Date Written: June 4, 2019

Abstract

This conversational-style essay is an exchange among fourteen professors — representing thirteen universities across five countries — with experience teaching with feminist judgments. Feminist judgments are “shadow” court decisions rewritten from a feminist perspective, using only the precedent in effect and the facts known at the time of the original decision. Scholars in Canada, England, the U.S., Australia, New Zealand, Scotland, Ireland, India and Mexico have published (or are currently producing) written collections of feminist judgments that demonstrate how feminist perspectives could have changed the legal reasoning or outcome (or both) in important legal cases.

This essay begins to explore the vast pedagogical potential of feminist judgments. The contributors to this conversation describe how they use feminist judgments in the classroom; how students have responded to the judgments; how the professors achieve specific learning objectives through teaching with feminist judgments; and how working with feminist judgments — whether studying them, writing them, or both — can help students excavate the multiple social, political, economic and even personal factors that influence the development of legal rules, structures, and institutions. The primary takeaway of the essay is that feminist judgments are a uniquely enriching pedagogical tool that can broaden the learning experience. Feminist judgments invite future lawyers, and indeed any reader, to re-imagine what the law is, what the law can be, and how to make the law more responsive to the needs of all people.

Suggested Citation

Crawford, Bridget J. and Stanchi, Kathryn and Berger, Linda L. and Appleby, Gabrielle J. and Appleton, Susan Frelich and Astoria, Ross and Cowan, Sharon and Dixon, Rosalind and Lavers, Troy and McArdle, Andrea L. and McDonald, Elisabeth and McMurtry-Chubb, Teri A. and Munro, Vanessa and Wilkins, Pamela, Teaching with Feminist Judgments: A Global Conversation (June 4, 2019). Law and Inequality: A Journal of Theory and Practice, Forthcoming. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3408202

Bridget J. Crawford (Contact Author)

Pace University School of Law ( email )

78 North Broadway
White Plains, NY 10603
United States

Kathryn Stanchi

University of Nevada, Las Vegas, William S. Boyd School of Law ( email )

4505 South Maryland Parkway
Box 451003
Las Vegas, NV 89154
United States

Linda L. Berger

University of Nevada, Las Vegas, William S. Boyd School of Law ( email )

4505 South Maryland Parkway
Box 451003
Las Vegas, NV 89154
United States

Gabrielle J. Appleby

University of New South Wales (UNSW) ( email )

Kensington
High St
Sydney, NSW 2052
Australia

HOME PAGE: http://www.law.unsw.edu.au/profile/gabrielle-appleby

Susan Frelich Appleton

Washington University in St. Louis - School of Law ( email )

Campus Box 1120
St. Louis, MO 63130
United States

Ross Astoria

University of Wisconsin - Parkside ( email )

900 Wood Road
P.O. Box 2000
Kenosha, WI 53141-2000
United States

Sharon Cowan

University of Edinburgh - School of Law ( email )

Old College
South Bridge
Edinburgh, EH8 9YL
United Kingdom

Rosalind Dixon

University of New South Wales (UNSW) - Faculty of Law ( email )

Kensington, New South Wales 2052
Australia

Troy Lavers

Leicester Law School ( email )

University Road
Leicester LE1 7RH, LE1 7RH
United Kingdom

Andrea L. McArdle

CUNY School of Law ( email )

2 Court Square
Room 4/309
Long Island City, NY 11101
United States
(718) 340-4348 (Phone)

Elisabeth McDonald

University of Canterbury ( email )

Ilam Road
Christchurch 8140
New Zealand

Teri A. McMurtry-Chubb

The John Marshall Law School ( email )

315 S. Plymouth Court
Chicago, IL 60604
United States

Mercer University - Walter F. George School of Law ( email )

1021 Georgia Ave
Macon, GA 31207-0001
United States

Vanessa Munro

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Pamela Wilkins

University of Detroit Mercy School of Law ( email )

651 East Jefferson Avenue
Detroit, MI 48226
United States
313-596-0250 (Phone)

Register to save articles to
your library

Register

Paper statistics

Downloads
77
Abstract Views
482
rank
311,961
PlumX Metrics