Brokering Orientations and Social Capital: Influencing Others’ Relationships Shapes Status and Trust

Forthcoming, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology

120 Pages Posted: 3 Jul 2019

See all articles by Nir Halevy

Nir Halevy

Stanford Graduate School of Business

Eliran Halali

Bar-Ilan University - Department of Psychology

Taya R. Cohen

Carnegie Mellon University, Tepper School of Business

Date Written: July 1, 2019

Abstract

Individuals often influence others’ relationships, for better or worse. We conceptualize social influence processes that impact others’ social networks as brokering, and advance a multifaceted model that explains how brokering behaviors can create, terminate, reinforce, and modify others’ network ties. To empirically study brokering, we introduce and validate the Brokering Orientations Scale (BOS), a multidimensional measure that captures individuals’ behavioral tendencies to act as intermediaries, conciliators, and dividers. Six studies (N=1,723) explored the psychometric properties of the BOS (Studies 1a-1c) and investigated the effects of distinct forms of brokering on brokers’ social capital (Studies 2-4). The intermediary, conciliatory and divisive brokering orientations related differently to extraversion, agreeableness, perspective-taking, moral identity and Machiavellianism, among other individual differences. The effects of brokering on social capital varied as a function of the brokering orientation and the aspect of social capital. Intermediary behavior garnered status; conciliatory behavior promoted trust and prestige; and divisive behavior fueled brokers’ perceived dominance. Overall, the current paper elucidates the concept of brokering orientations, introduces a novel measure of brokering orientations, and explains how brokering behavior shapes brokers’ social capital.

Keywords: Brokering Orientation Scale, scale development, social influence, social networks, group processes, status, prestige, dominance

Suggested Citation

Halevy, Nir and Halali, Eliran and Cohen, Taya R., Brokering Orientations and Social Capital: Influencing Others’ Relationships Shapes Status and Trust (July 1, 2019). Forthcoming, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3413739 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3413739

Nir Halevy

Stanford Graduate School of Business ( email )

655 Knight Way
Stanford, CA 94305-5015
United States

Eliran Halali

Bar-Ilan University - Department of Psychology ( email )

Israel
972-3-531-8717 (Phone)

Taya R. Cohen (Contact Author)

Carnegie Mellon University, Tepper School of Business ( email )

5000 Forbes Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15213-3890
United States
4122686677 (Phone)

HOME PAGE: http://www.tepper.cmu.edu/our-faculty-and-research/about-our-faculty/faculty-profiles/tcohen/cohen-t

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