Winks, Whispers, and Prosecutorial Discretion in Rural Iowa, 1925-1928

Annals of Iowa, 79:3 (Summer 2020), 247-83.

Posted: 6 Oct 2020

See all articles by Emily Prifogle

Emily Prifogle

University of Michigan Law School

Date Written: July 30, 2020

Abstract

Through the eyes of Charles Pendleton’s memoirs, this article walks through a rural community with a county attorney to consider how race, religion, gender, and sexuality influenced rural prosecutorial discretion in the early twentieth century. Rural communities like those in Buena Vista County, Iowa, where the article is centered, experienced “the law” through distinctly isolated geographies and social networks that lacked anonymity and thus shaped available methods of conflict resolution. But anonymity did not mean homogeneity. Ethnic, racial, and religious diversity created divisions within a community where social distance between individuals was small. Both onymity and diversity shaped who should have access to legal and nonlegal sanctions and remedies.

Available via EBSCOhost.

Keywords: Prosecutorial Discretion, Rural, Gender, Race, Legal History

Suggested Citation

Prifogle, Emily, Winks, Whispers, and Prosecutorial Discretion in Rural Iowa, 1925-1928 (July 30, 2020). Annals of Iowa, 79:3 (Summer 2020), 247-83., Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3415718

Emily Prifogle (Contact Author)

University of Michigan Law School ( email )

625 South State Street
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1215
United States

HOME PAGE: http://www.emilyprifogle.com

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