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Lactobacilli Have a Niche in the Human Nose

44 Pages Posted: 19 Jul 2019 Sneak Peek Status: Review Complete

See all articles by Ilke De Boeck

Ilke De Boeck

University of Antwerp - Department of Bioscience Engineering

Marianne F.L. van den Broek

University of Antwerp - Department of Bioscience Engineering

Camille Nina Allonsius

University of Antwerp - Department of Bioscience Engineering

Katleen Martens

KU Leuven - Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Transplantation, Allergy and Clinical Immunology Research Unit

Sander Wuyts

University of Antwerp - Department of Bioscience Engineering

Stijn Wittouck

University of Antwerp - Department of Bioscience Engineering

Eline Cauwenberghs

University of Antwerp - Department of Bioscience Engineering

Katarina Jokicevic

University of Antwerp - Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Technology and Biopharmacy

Dieter Vandenheuvel

University of Antwerp - Department of Bioscience Engineering

Irina Spacova

University of Antwerp - Department of Bioscience Engineering

Michelle Lemarcq

University of Leuven - Department of Microbial and Molecular Systems

Charlotte De Rudder

Ghent University - Center for Microbial Ecology and Technology

Sofie Thys

University of Antwerp - Department of Veterinary Sciences

Jean-Pierre Timmermans

University of Antwerp - Department of Veterinary Sciences

Anneclaire V. Vroegop

University of Antwerp - Head and Neck Surgery and Communication Disorders

Alex Verplaetse

University of Leuven - Department of Microbial and Molecular Systems

Tom Van de Wiele

Ghent University - Center for Microbial Ecology and Technology

Filip Kiekens

University of Antwerp - Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Technology and Biopharmacy

Peter Hellings

University of Antwerp - Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Technology and Biopharmacy

Olivier M. Vanderveken

University of Antwerp - Head and Neck Surgery and Communication Disorders

Sarah Lebeer

University of Antwerp - Department of Bioscience Engineering

More...

Abstract

While an increasing number of beneficial microbiome members is characterized for the human gut and vagina, beneficial microbes are underexplored for the human upper respiratory tract (URT). In this study, we demonstrate that taxa from the beneficial Lactobacillus genus might have a role as keystone species in the healthy URT. Several URT-specific Lactobacillus isolates were cultured, characterized, and further explored for their genetic and functional properties related to adaptation to the URT. Catalase genes were found in the identified Lactobacillus taxa, which is a unique feature within this mostly facultative anaerobic genus. Moreover, one of our isolated strains, Lactobacillus casei AMBR2, contained unique fimbriae enabling strong adherence to URT epithelium, inhibited the growth and virulence of several URT pathogens, and successfully colonized nasal epithelium of healthy volunteers. This study thus demonstrates that specific Lactobacillus taxa are adapted to the URT and could have a beneficial keystone function in this habitat.

Keywords: commensal, upper respiratory tract, niche-adaptation, microbiome, probiotics

Suggested Citation

De Boeck, Ilke and van den Broek, Marianne F.L. and Allonsius, Camille Nina and Martens, Katleen and Wuyts, Sander and Wittouck, Stijn and Cauwenberghs, Eline and Jokicevic, Katarina and Vandenheuvel, Dieter and Spacova, Irina and Lemarcq, Michelle and De Rudder, Charlotte and Thys, Sofie and Timmermans, Jean-Pierre and Vroegop, Anneclaire V. and Verplaetse, Alex and Van de Wiele, Tom and Kiekens, Filip and Hellings, Peter and Vanderveken, Olivier M. and Lebeer, Sarah, Lactobacilli Have a Niche in the Human Nose (July 19, 2019). CELL-REPORTS-D-19-02655. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3422481 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3422481
This is a paper under consideration at Cell Press and has not been peer-reviewed.

Ilke De Boeck

University of Antwerp - Department of Bioscience Engineering

Belgium

Marianne F.L. Van den Broek

University of Antwerp - Department of Bioscience Engineering

Belgium

Camille Nina Allonsius

University of Antwerp - Department of Bioscience Engineering

Belgium

Katleen Martens

KU Leuven - Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Transplantation, Allergy and Clinical Immunology Research Unit

Leuven
Belgium

Sander Wuyts

University of Antwerp - Department of Bioscience Engineering

Belgium

Stijn Wittouck

University of Antwerp - Department of Bioscience Engineering

Belgium

Eline Cauwenberghs

University of Antwerp - Department of Bioscience Engineering

Belgium

Katarina Jokicevic

University of Antwerp - Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Technology and Biopharmacy

Belgium

Dieter Vandenheuvel

University of Antwerp - Department of Bioscience Engineering

Belgium

Irina Spacova

University of Antwerp - Department of Bioscience Engineering

Belgium

Michelle Lemarcq

University of Leuven - Department of Microbial and Molecular Systems

Belgium

Charlotte De Rudder

Ghent University - Center for Microbial Ecology and Technology

Belgium

Sofie Thys

University of Antwerp - Department of Veterinary Sciences

Belgium

Jean-Pierre Timmermans

University of Antwerp - Department of Veterinary Sciences

Belgium

Anneclaire V. Vroegop

University of Antwerp - Head and Neck Surgery and Communication Disorders

Belgium

Alex Verplaetse

University of Leuven - Department of Microbial and Molecular Systems

Belgium

Tom Van de Wiele

Ghent University - Center for Microbial Ecology and Technology

Belgium

Filip Kiekens

University of Antwerp - Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Technology and Biopharmacy

Belgium

Peter Hellings

University of Antwerp - Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Technology and Biopharmacy

Belgium

Olivier M. Vanderveken

University of Antwerp - Head and Neck Surgery and Communication Disorders

Belgium

Sarah Lebeer (Contact Author)

University of Antwerp - Department of Bioscience Engineering

Belgium

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