Alternative Schools for Minority Students: The Constitution, the Civil Rights Act, and the Berkeley Experiment

61 Cal. L. Rev. 858 (1973)

62 Pages Posted: 6 Aug 2019

See all articles by Susan Frelich Appleton

Susan Frelich Appleton

Washington University in St. Louis - School of Law

Date Written: 1973

Abstract

This law-student piece describes and analyzes an experimental educational program in the early 1970s in Berkeley, California, allowing Black and Hispanic students the option to attend separate public schools open only to members of each of these demographic groups. Despite the legal obstacles faced by such identity-based schooling, including the 1964 Civil Rights Act and evolving constitutional arguments about education and race, the Comment identifies several justifications that support the experiment as a valuable but exceptional case.

Keywords: schools, race, ethnicity, segregation, civil rights act, equal protection

Suggested Citation

Appleton, Susan Frelich, Alternative Schools for Minority Students: The Constitution, the Civil Rights Act, and the Berkeley Experiment (1973). 61 Cal. L. Rev. 858 (1973). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3430718

Susan Frelich Appleton (Contact Author)

Washington University in St. Louis - School of Law ( email )

Campus Box 1120
St. Louis, MO 63130
United States

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