Mortality and Socioeconomic Consequences of Prescription Opioids: Evidence from State Policies

52 Pages Posted: 7 Aug 2019 Last revised: 30 May 2022

See all articles by Robert Kaestner

Robert Kaestner

National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER); University of Chicago

Engy Ziedan

Tulane University

Date Written: August 2019

Abstract

This article presents estimates of the effects of state prescription opioid policies on prescription opioid sales, mortality and socioeconomic outcomes of adults. Results indicate that state implementation of a “modern” PDMP is associated with decreases in opioid sales of between 5% and 20% and that pill mill laws are associated with a decrease in opioid sales of between 15% and 50%. The reductions in prescription opioid sales associated with these state policies were, in general, not associated with statistically significant effects on mortality. In the case of socioeconomic outcomes, we found consistent evidence that the adoption of a “modern” PDMP was associated with small, but statistically significant reductions in employment of 1% to 2% across all demographic groups examined; small reductions in earnings that were not statistically significant and similarly small, marginally significant increases in receipt of public assistance, particularly for women; and a significant, but small (1%) decline in the probability of being married among females. In contrast, pill mill laws were associated with marginally significant increases in employment of 1% to 2%, but only among those ages 18 to 25; small, but insignificant increases in earnings of males of between 2% to 4%; and a significant, but small (1%) decline in the probability of being married among all demographic groups.

Suggested Citation

Kaestner, Robert and Kaestner, Robert and Ziedan, Engy, Mortality and Socioeconomic Consequences of Prescription Opioids: Evidence from State Policies (August 2019). NBER Working Paper No. w26135, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3432168

Robert Kaestner (Contact Author)

National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

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University of Chicago ( email )

1155 East 60th Street
Chicago, IL 60637
United States

Engy Ziedan

Tulane University ( email )

New Orleans, LA 70118
United States

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