Video Games and Unemployment: Are Gamers Noobs as Workers?

26 Pages Posted: 8 Aug 2019

See all articles by Petr Parshakov

Petr Parshakov

National Research University Higher School of Economics

Sofiia Paklina

National Research University Higher School of Economics - International Laboratory of Intangible-driven Economy

Alexei Chadov

National Research University Higher School of Economics - National Research University Higher School of Economics (Perm)

Dennis Coates

University of Maryland, Baltimore County

Date Written: August 5, 2019

Abstract

Video games are treated as an innovation in leisure activity that makes being unemployed more attractive than before. In this study we develop a theoretical model and empirically test whether the popularity of video games influences the total and youth unemployment. Our results of regression analysis show a positive influence of the popularity of video games on the unemployment rate. In addition, we analyze this effect for countries with different levels of income and labor productivity. We found a significant inverse relationship between income level and the effect of the popularity of video games on total and youth unemployment.

Keywords: e-sports, leisure innovation, unemployment, video games, youth unemployment

JEL Classification: J22, Z2

Suggested Citation

Parshakov, Petr and Paklina, Sofiia and Chadov, Alexei and Coates, Dennis, Video Games and Unemployment: Are Gamers Noobs as Workers? (August 5, 2019). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3432348 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3432348

Petr Parshakov (Contact Author)

National Research University Higher School of Economics ( email )

Myasnitskaya street, 20
Moscow, Moscow 119017
Russia

Sofiia Paklina

National Research University Higher School of Economics - International Laboratory of Intangible-driven Economy ( email )

Lebedeva,27
Perm, Perm 614070
Russia

Alexei Chadov

National Research University Higher School of Economics - National Research University Higher School of Economics (Perm) ( email )

38 Studencheskaya Ulitsa
Perm, Permsky kray 614070
Russia

Dennis Coates

University of Maryland, Baltimore County ( email )

1000 Hilltop Circle
Baltimore, MD 21250
United States
410-455-3243 (Phone)
410-455-1054 (Fax)

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