‘A Southern College Slipped from Its Geographical Moorings’: Slavery at Princeton

39 Slavery & Abolition 236, 250 (2018), DOI: 10.1080/0144039X.2018.1446785

SMU Dedman School of Law Legal Studies Research Paper No. 433

Posted: 8 Aug 2019

See all articles by Lolita Buckner Inniss

Lolita Buckner Inniss

Southern Methodist University - Dedman School of Law

Date Written: 2018

Abstract

While slave-owning students at Princeton rarely constituted a majority of students, they were often a large plurality of the students in the antebellum period. Because of Princeton's historic role in educating southerners, it has sometimes been referred to as the most southern of the Ivy League schools. So many students from the United States South enrolled at Princeton during the first several decades of the college that one observer wrote that one might take Princeton for a ‘Southern college slipped from its geographical moorings.’ This article explores the extent to which and whether Princeton behaved like a southern institution in its speech and actions concerning slavery and emancipation.

Keywords: College of New Jersey (Princeton) - racial history, Princeton - slavery, slaves, slave owners, racism, abolition, emancipation

Suggested Citation

Buckner Inniss, Lolita, ‘A Southern College Slipped from Its Geographical Moorings’: Slavery at Princeton (2018). 39 Slavery & Abolition 236, 250 (2018), DOI: 10.1080/0144039X.2018.1446785; SMU Dedman School of Law Legal Studies Research Paper No. 433. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3433803

Lolita Buckner Inniss (Contact Author)

Southern Methodist University - Dedman School of Law ( email )

P.O. Box 750116
Dallas, TX 75275
United States

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