Technology Transfer under China’s Foreign Investment Regime: Does the WTO Provide a Solution?

Forthcoming (2020) 54(3) Journal of World Trade

UNSW Law Research Paper No. 19-59

21 Pages Posted: 13 Aug 2019

See all articles by Weihuan Zhou

Weihuan Zhou

University of New South Wales (UNSW) - Faculty of Law

Huiqin Jiang

University of New South Wales

Qingjiang Kong

Lauterpacht Research Centre for International Law

Date Written: July 30, 2019

Abstract

One of the most longstanding and significant issues in the U.S.-China trade war and international trade regulation in general has been the so-called “forced” technology transfer. To contribute to the ongoing debate over this issue, this article reviews the role of technology transfer in the evolution of China’s foreign direct investment (“FDI”) regime over the past four decades and shows that the use of foreign investment to promote diffusion of advanced technology and know-how in the Chinese economy has long been rooted in the heart of China’s FDI policy and remains fundamental for China’s transformation to an innovative economy. This pursuit of economic upgrade and technological advancement is not illegitimate as it is common for countries to use similar policies for similar objectives at different stages of economic development. The question is whether China has done so in breach of its WTO obligations. To answer this question, this article examines China’s new FDI regime and argues that while China has removed the controversial provisions in the relevant legislations, the regime leaves flexibility for China to “force” technology transfer in practice, particularly under the security review and retaliation mechanisms envisaged in the new Foreign Investment Law. It is submitted that the best way to address these outstanding challenges would be through the dispute settlement mechanism of the WTO as opposed to unilateral and confrontational approaches which have proven to be counter-productive. While WTO litigation is likely to be limited to “as applied” claims in specific cases, systemic changes may result from a series of successful “piecemeal” attacks over time. Given China’s broad WTO commitments on technology transfer, we call for an increasing use of the existing rules to address any laws and practices that “force” technology transfer instead of negotiating new rules.

Keywords: WTO, China, 'Forced' Technology Transfer, Foreign Investment, Trade, Intellectual Property

Suggested Citation

Zhou, Weihuan and Jiang, Huiqin and Kong, Qingjiang, Technology Transfer under China’s Foreign Investment Regime: Does the WTO Provide a Solution? (July 30, 2019). Forthcoming (2020) 54(3) Journal of World Trade , UNSW Law Research Paper No. 19-59, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3436484 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3436484

Weihuan Zhou (Contact Author)

University of New South Wales (UNSW) - Faculty of Law ( email )

Kensington, New South Wales 2052
Australia
+61 2 90652102 (Phone)

HOME PAGE: https://www.law.unsw.edu.au/staff/weihuan-zhou

Huiqin Jiang

University of New South Wales ( email )

Sydney
Australia

Qingjiang Kong

Lauterpacht Research Centre for International Law ( email )

5 Cranmer Road
Cambridge CB3 9BL
United Kingdom
+44 1223 335 358 226 (Phone)
+44 1223 300 406 (Fax)

Do you have a job opening that you would like to promote on SSRN?

Paper statistics

Downloads
373
Abstract Views
1,618
rank
98,530
PlumX Metrics