What Do Voting Results of the 2016 Election Tell Us About Bias Response Team?

21 Pages Posted: 7 Jul 2020

See all articles by Ramon P. DeGennaro

Ramon P. DeGennaro

University of Tennessee, Knoxville - Department of Finance

Date Written: August 23, 2018

Abstract

Many universities have established Bias Response Teams, or BRTs. BRTs are mechanisms that encourage students and employees to report alleged instances of bias. In practice, such reports are often, and perhaps usually, anonymous, and typically lead to extralegal tribunals with few due process protections for the accused. Because accusations of offense are often based on the accused person’s speech or writings, BRTs have run afoul of the defendant’s First Amendment rights. Because awareness of and support for the First Amendment differs between Republicans and Democrats, we ask whether election results are correlated with the existence of BRTs. We find that an increase in Republican Congressional vote share is associated with a small decrease in the frequency of BRTs, but Presidential vote shares, Senate vote shares, and the vote shares in the Congressional district of the university are unrelated to the frequency of BRTs.

Keywords: Bias Response Teams; First Amendment; Speed Codes

Suggested Citation

DeGennaro, Ramon P., What Do Voting Results of the 2016 Election Tell Us About Bias Response Team? (August 23, 2018). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3437253 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3437253

Ramon P. DeGennaro (Contact Author)

University of Tennessee, Knoxville - Department of Finance ( email )

423 Stokely Management Center
Knoxville, TN 37996
United States
865-974-1726 (Phone)
865-974-1716 (Fax)

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