Chapter 10: Torts Through the Looking Glass

The Media Method: Teaching Law with Popular Culture (Christine A. Corcos ed., Carolina Academic Press 2019)

Posted: 19 Aug 2019

See all articles by Richard J. Peltz-Steele

Richard J. Peltz-Steele

University of Massachusetts School of Law at Dartmouth

Date Written: August 15, 2019

Abstract

Students today view the world relative to its representations in digital media. This digital looking glass, or mirror, of reality incorporates fact and fiction and has itself come to define our popular culture. Accordingly, today’s students benefit from the examination and analysis of challenging subject matter in the real world relative to its digital imaginings. Instructors in torts can promote learning by bringing into the classroom popular cultural expressions extracted from the vast audiovisual libraries of the Internet. These demonstrative exhibits can be used to support problem analysis, to explore policy and theory, to bridge study and practice, and to raise issues in professionalism. This chapter demonstrates the range of multimedia material available in popular culture today with relevance to torts. My aim is to encourage instructors to build their own libraries of materials and to enhance student learning by holding up torts to the looking glass.

Keywords: pedagogy, teaching, legal education, law school, popular culture, torts, audiovisual, television, film, literature

JEL Classification: I23, K39, K49

Suggested Citation

Peltz-Steele, Richard J., Chapter 10: Torts Through the Looking Glass (August 15, 2019). The Media Method: Teaching Law with Popular Culture (Christine A. Corcos ed., Carolina Academic Press 2019). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3437895

Richard J. Peltz-Steele (Contact Author)

University of Massachusetts School of Law at Dartmouth ( email )

333 Faunce Corner Road
North Dartmouth, MA 02747-1252
United States
15089851102 (Phone)

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