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Human-Like Time-Compressed Forward Replay of Video Episodes in Macaque Monkeys

38 Pages Posted: 19 Aug 2019 Sneak Peek Status: Review Complete

See all articles by Shuzhen Zuo

Shuzhen Zuo

East China Normal University (ECNU) - Shanghai Key Laboratory of Brain Functional Genomics

Lei Wang

East China Normal University (ECNU) - Shanghai Key Laboratory of Brain Functional Genomics

Junghan Shin

Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) - Program of Brain and Cognitive Engineering

Yudian Cai

East China Normal University (ECNU) - Shanghai Key Laboratory of Brain Functional Genomics

Sang Wan Lee

Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) - Department of Bio and Brain Engineering

Kofi Appiah

Sheffield Hallam University - Department of Computing

Yong-di Zhou

East China Normal University (ECNU) - Shanghai Key Laboratory of Brain Functional Genomics

Sze Chai Kwok

East China Normal University (ECNU) - Shanghai Key Laboratory of Brain Functional Genomics

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Abstract

Humans can perform episodic memory replay dynamically by replaying fragments of fine-grained temporal patterns of events and skipping flexibly across subevents. Here, we demonstrate a similar effect in macaque monkeys. We report evidence that the monkeys apply a time-compressed, forward replay mechanism during their judgement the order of cinematic events. We trained six macaque monkeys with a temporal order judgement (TOJ) task and collected 5000 TOJ trials with naturalistic videos. In each trial, they watched a video of about 10 s comprising two across-context clips, and after a 2-s retention delay, performed a temporal order judgement between two frames extracted from the video. The results show that the monkeys adopt a self-terminating search of ordered frames in their mnemonic representation. The memory replay is forward and temporally compressed, paralleling evidence in humans. Such compression of replay is however not sophisticated enough to allow them to skip over irrelevant information by compressing the encoded video globally. Moreover, we also reveal that the monkeys can segment events using contextual boundaries like humans and such contextual segmentation facilitates their memory recall by an increased rate of information accumulation in a drift diffusion model framework. Memory replay is an elaborate mental process and our demonstration of a time-compressed, forward replay mechanism in the macaque monkeys provides insights into mapping the mechanisms and evolution of episodic memory in our lineage.

Keywords: drift diffusion model framework, event segmentation, forward replay mechanism, macaques, memory replay, naturalistic material, time-compression of memory traces

Suggested Citation

Zuo, Shuzhen and Wang, Lei and Shin, Junghan and Cai, Yudian and Lee, Sang Wan and Appiah, Kofi and Zhou, Yong-di and Kwok, Sze Chai, Human-Like Time-Compressed Forward Replay of Video Episodes in Macaque Monkeys (August 16, 2019). CURRENT-BIOLOGY-D-19-01352. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3438378 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3438378
This is a paper under consideration at Cell Press and has not been peer-reviewed.

Shuzhen Zuo

East China Normal University (ECNU) - Shanghai Key Laboratory of Brain Functional Genomics ( email )

China

Lei Wang

East China Normal University (ECNU) - Shanghai Key Laboratory of Brain Functional Genomics

China

Junghan Shin

Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) - Program of Brain and Cognitive Engineering

Korea, Republic of (South Korea)

Yudian Cai

East China Normal University (ECNU) - Shanghai Key Laboratory of Brain Functional Genomics

China

Sang Wan Lee

Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) - Department of Bio and Brain Engineering

Korea, Republic of (South Korea)

Kofi Appiah

Sheffield Hallam University - Department of Computing

United Kingdom

Yong-di Zhou

East China Normal University (ECNU) - Shanghai Key Laboratory of Brain Functional Genomics ( email )

China

Sze Chai Kwok (Contact Author)

East China Normal University (ECNU) - Shanghai Key Laboratory of Brain Functional Genomics ( email )

China

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