Becoming a Domestic Worker: The Case of Mpumalanga Province, South Africa

12 Pages Posted: 19 Aug 2019

See all articles by Tsoaledi Daniel Thobejane

Tsoaledi Daniel Thobejane

University of Venda - Institute for Gender and Youth Studies

Sibongile Khoza

University of Venda - Institute for Gender and Youth Studies

Date Written: March 30, 2019

Abstract

This research unpacked the challenges experienced by domestic workers in the Mpumalanga province of South Africa. Domestic workers play a pivotal role in supporting the labour market and economy. However, this work is often gender biased. The research pursued a gendered approach in an attempt to examine the challenges faced by domestic workers in the area. A qualitative research approach was used in the investigation. The findings of the study are that harassment of domestic workers at their workplace affects their lives negatively as they often lose concentration and become unproductive and ineffective at work. The study results showed that domestic workers from rural areas face more challenges than domestic workers from urban areas. This is due to the fact that their conditions in urban areas are more improved than in rural areas. The study also established that domestic workers resort to keeping quiet and do not communicate with their employers for fear that they will be victimized. However, some of them pointed out that they exercise patience when dealing with their employers because of fear of losing their jobs. The research also established that domestic workers are the most oppressed and exploited sector of the economy in South Africa.

Keywords: domestic work, patriarchy, gender, feminism, documented workers, dignified labour

Suggested Citation

Thobejane, Tsoaledi Daniel and Khoza, Sibongile, Becoming a Domestic Worker: The Case of Mpumalanga Province, South Africa (March 30, 2019). OIDA International Journal of Sustainable Development, Vol. 12, No. 03, pp. 27-38, 2019. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3438994

Tsoaledi Daniel Thobejane (Contact Author)

University of Venda - Institute for Gender and Youth Studies ( email )

Private Bag X5050
Thohoyandou, Limpopo Province 0950
South Africa

Sibongile Khoza

University of Venda - Institute for Gender and Youth Studies ( email )

Private Bag X5050
Thohoyandou, Limpopo Province 0950
South Africa

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