The Effects of Chess Instruction on Academic and Non-Cognitive Outcomes: Field Experimental Evidence from a Developing Country

66 Pages Posted: 4 Sep 2019

See all articles by Asad Islam

Asad Islam

Monash University - Department of Economics

Wang-Sheng Lee

Deakin University

Aaron Nicholas

Deakin University

Abstract

We conduct a randomized field experiment to investigate the benefits of an intensive chess training program undertaken by primary school students in a developing country context. We examine the effects on academic outcomes, and a number of non-cognitive outcomes: risk preferences, patience, creativity and attention/focus. Our main finding is that chess training reduces the level of risk aversion almost a year after the intervention ended. We also find that chess training improves math scores, reduces the incidence of time inconsistency and the incidence of non-monotonic time preferences. However, these (non-risk preference) results are less conclu-sive once we account for multiple hypothesis testing. We do not find any evidence of significant effects of chess training on other academic outcomes, creativity, and attention/focus.

Keywords: chess training, math, non-cognitive outcomes, risk, randomized experiment

JEL Classification: C93, D80, I21

Suggested Citation

Islam, Asadul and Lee, Wang-Sheng and Nicholas, Aaron, The Effects of Chess Instruction on Academic and Non-Cognitive Outcomes: Field Experimental Evidence from a Developing Country. IZA Discussion Paper No. 12550, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3445816

Asadul Islam (Contact Author)

Monash University - Department of Economics ( email )

Department of Economics
Monash University
Caulfield East, Victoria
Australia
+61399032783 (Phone)

HOME PAGE: http://users.monash.edu/~asaduli/

Wang-Sheng Lee

Deakin University

Aaron Nicholas

Deakin University ( email )

75 Elgar Rd
Burwood, Victoria 3125
Australia

Here is the Coronavirus
related research on SSRN

Paper statistics

Downloads
13
Abstract Views
131
PlumX Metrics