Do US TRAP Laws Trap Women Into Bad Jobs?

Kate Bahn, Adriana Kugler, Melissa Holly Mahoney & Annie McGrew (2019) Do US TRAP Laws Trap Women Into Bad Jobs?, Feminist Economics, DOI: 10.1080/13545701.2019.1622029

Posted: 5 Sep 2019

See all articles by Adriana D. Kugler

Adriana D. Kugler

McCourt School of Public Policy ; Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR); IZA Institute of Labor Economics; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Kate Bahn

New School for Social Research

Melissa Holly Mahoney

Bard College

Annie McGrew

Independent

Date Written: August 19, 2019

Abstract

This study explores the impact of women’s access to reproductive healthcare on labor market opportunities in the US. Previous research finds that access to the contraception pill delayed age at first birth and increased access to a university degree, labor force participation, and wages for women. This study examines how access to contraceptives and abortions impacts job mobility. If women cannot control family planning or doing so is heavily dependent on staying in one job, it is more difficult to plan for and take risks in their careers. Using data from the Current Population Survey’s Outgoing Rotation Group, this study finds that Targeted Restrictions on Abortion Providers (TRAP) laws increased “job lock.” Women in states with TRAP laws are less likely to move between occupations and into higher-paying occupations. Moreover, public funding for medically necessary abortions increases full-time occupational mobility, and contraceptive insurance coverage increases transitions into paid employment.

Keywords: Abortion, Occupational Mobility, Job Lock, Contraception, Trap Laws, Labor Force Participation

JEL Classification: I18, J13, J62

Suggested Citation

Kugler, Adriana Debora and Bahn, Kate and Mahoney, Melissa Holly and McGrew, Annie, Do US TRAP Laws Trap Women Into Bad Jobs? (August 19, 2019). Kate Bahn, Adriana Kugler, Melissa Holly Mahoney & Annie McGrew (2019) Do US TRAP Laws Trap Women Into Bad Jobs?, Feminist Economics, DOI: 10.1080/13545701.2019.1622029. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3448262

Adriana Debora Kugler (Contact Author)

McCourt School of Public Policy ( email )

3700 O ST NW
311 Old North
Washington, DC 20057
United States

Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR) ( email )

London
United Kingdom

IZA Institute of Labor Economics ( email )

P.O. Box 7240
Bonn, D-53072
Germany

National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) ( email )

1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

Kate Bahn

New School for Social Research ( email )

6 East 16th Street
New York, NY 10003
United States

Melissa Holly Mahoney

Bard College ( email )

Annandale-on-Hudson, NY 12504-5000
United States

Annie McGrew

Independent ( email )

No Address Available

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