Flexible Work Arrangement Initiatives and Commitment Outcome of Selected Technology-Based Banks

International Journal of Mechanical Engineering and Technology 10(3), 2019, pp. 161-171

11 Pages Posted: 19 Sep 2019

See all articles by Olumuyiwa Oludayo

Olumuyiwa Oludayo

Covenant University

Odunayo Salau

Covenant University

Falola Hezekiah

Covenant University, Nigeria

Atolagbe, T. M.

Covenant University, Km. 10, Idiroko Road, Canaan Land, Ota, Nigeria

Ogueyungbo, A.

Covenant University, Km. 10, Idiroko Road, Canaan Land, Ota, Nigeria

Fatogun, T.O.

Covenant University, Km. 10, Idiroko Road, Canaan Land, Ota, Nigeria

Date Written: September 11, 2019

Abstract

There have been dramatic changes in workforce demographics over the past few decades affecting employment relation. As a result, flexible work pattern became a common initiative used by organizations globally in response to various challenges faced in demanding industries like the banking sector. Despite the efforts of management to facilitate quality life, concerns regarding how this practice contributes to greater commitment remain worrisome. Descriptive approach was used and the target respondents comprises purposively selected commercial banks staff in Lagos state. Data collected were through the use of questionnaire and analysed through a variance-based model. Findings revealed that the strongest predictor of flexible work pattern initiatives is flex location specifically telecommuting, followed by flexitime which comprises of the use of shifting swaps, flex-hours and compressed work weeks while flexitime-off had the least.

Keywords: Flexible work pattern, Flextime, Flex location, Behaviour, Commitment

Suggested Citation

Oludayo, Olumuyiwa and Salau, Odunayo and Hezekiah, Falola and T. M., Atolagbe, and A., Ogueyungbo, and T.O., Fatogun,, Flexible Work Arrangement Initiatives and Commitment Outcome of Selected Technology-Based Banks (September 11, 2019). International Journal of Mechanical Engineering and Technology 10(3), 2019, pp. 161-171, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3451696

Olumuyiwa Oludayo

Covenant University ( email )

P.M.B. 1023
Km 10 Idiroko road
Ota, Ogun State 234
Nigeria

Odunayo Salau (Contact Author)

Covenant University ( email )

P.M.B. 1023
Km 10 Idiroko road
Ota, Ogun State 234
Nigeria

Falola Hezekiah

Covenant University, Nigeria ( email )

P.M.B. 1023
Km 10 Idiroko road
Ota, Ogun State 234
Nigeria

Atolagbe, T. M.

Covenant University, Km. 10, Idiroko Road, Canaan Land, Ota, Nigeria ( email )

P.M.B. 1023
Km 10 Idiroko road
Ota, Ogun State 234
Nigeria

Ogueyungbo, A.

Covenant University, Km. 10, Idiroko Road, Canaan Land, Ota, Nigeria ( email )

P.M.B. 1023
Km 10 Idiroko road
Ota, Ogun State 234
Nigeria

Fatogun, T.O.

Covenant University, Km. 10, Idiroko Road, Canaan Land, Ota, Nigeria ( email )

P.M.B. 1023
Km 10 Idiroko road
Ota, Ogun State 234
Nigeria

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