A Decade-Long View of Multidimensional Deprivation in the United States

IRP Discussion Paper No. 1440-19

24 Pages Posted: 30 Sep 2019

See all articles by Shatakshee Dhongde

Shatakshee Dhongde

Georgia Institute of Technology

Robert Haveman

University of Wisconsin - Madison - Department of Economics; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER); IZA Institute of Labor Economics; CESifo (Center for Economic Studies and Ifo Institute)

Date Written: September 18, 2019

Abstract

This paper undertakes a comprehensive analysis of temporal trends in multidimensional deprivation in the United States. It provides, for the first time, estimates of multidimensional deprivation in the United States for an entire decade, from 2008 to 2017, which covers the Great Recession and the recovery following the recession when major policy changes such as the Affordable Care Act were implemented. We measure annual changes in deprivation levels, across states and among demographic groups by age, gender, income, and race. Multidimensional deprivation is estimated using individual data from the American Community Survey, the largest household survey conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau. We find that about 13.5 percent of the U.S. population was deprived in at least two dimensions. Deprivation was high among individuals having income just above the poverty line, among young adults (aged 18 to 24 years), and among Hispanics and foreign-born individuals. In the midst of the Great Recession, more than 15 percent of population was multidimensionally deprived, but deprivation consistently declined during the recovery period.

Keywords: poverty, multidimensional, Affordable Care Act, recession, United States

JEL Classification: I31, I32, O51

Suggested Citation

Dhongde, Shatakshee and Haveman, Robert H., A Decade-Long View of Multidimensional Deprivation in the United States (September 18, 2019). IRP Discussion Paper No. 1440-19. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3456261 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3456261

Shatakshee Dhongde (Contact Author)

Georgia Institute of Technology ( email )

Atlanta, GA 30332
United States

Robert H. Haveman

University of Wisconsin - Madison - Department of Economics ( email )

1180 Observatory Drive
Madison, WI 53706
United States
608-263-7398 (Phone)

National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

IZA Institute of Labor Economics

P.O. Box 7240
Bonn, D-53072
Germany

CESifo (Center for Economic Studies and Ifo Institute)

Poschinger Str. 5
Munich, DE-81679
Germany

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