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Ancient Hybridization with Unknown Population Facilitated High Altitude Adaptation of Canids

60 Pages Posted: 20 Sep 2019 Publication Status: Review Complete

See all articles by Ming-Shan Wang

Ming-Shan Wang

Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) - State Key Laboratory of Genetic Resources and Evolution; University of California, Santa Cruz - Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Sheng Wang

Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) - State Key Laboratory of Genetic Resources and Evolution

Yan Li

Yunnan University - State Key Laboratory for Conservation and Utilization of Bio-resource

Yadvendradev Jhala

Wildlife Institute of India

Mukesh Thakur

Wildlife Institute of India

Newton Otecko

Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) - State Key Laboratory of Genetic Resources and Evolution

Jing-Fang Si

China Agricultural University - Laboratory of Animal Genetics, Breeding and Reproduction

Hong-Man Chen

Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) - State Key Laboratory of Genetic Resources and Evolution

Beth Shapiro

University of California, Santa Cruz - Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Rasmus Nielsen

University of Copenhagen - Centre for GeoGenetics

Ya-Ping Zhang

Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) - State Key Laboratory of Genetic Resources and Evolution

Dong-Dong Wu

Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) - State Key Laboratory of Genetic Resources and Evolution

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Abstract

Genetic introgression provides material for adaptive evolution, but also confounds our understanding of evolutionary history. This is particularly true for canids, a species complex including dogs, wolves, coyotes, jackals, and other wolf-like carnivores, in which genomic analyses have revealed a complex history of admixture and introgression. Among the most enigmatic canid lineages whose origin and evolutionary relationships remain unresolved are the high-altitude wolves of the Tibetan Plateau, the Tibetan grey wolf and the Himalayan wolf. Here, we use newly assembled genomes of high-altitude Tibetan and Himalayan wolves to explore the evolutionary history and adaptation of this charismatic group. We find that Tibetan and Himalayan wolves are closely related to each other, and that as much as 38-43% of their nuclear genome is derived from an as-yet unrecognized wolf-like lineage that is deeply diverged from living Holarctic wolves and dogs. The EPAS1 haplotype, which is present at high frequencies in Tibetan dog breeds and wolves and confers an adaptive advantage to animals living at high altitudes, was probably derived from this ancient lineage. Our study underscores the complexity of canid evolution and demonstrates how admixture and introgression shape the evolutionary trajectories and adaptation of species.

Keywords: hybridization, adaptive evolution, evolutionary history, canid, introgression

Suggested Citation

Wang, Ming-Shan and Wang, Sheng and Li, Yan and Jhala, Yadvendradev and Thakur, Mukesh and Otecko, Newton and Si, Jing-Fang and Chen, Hong-Man and Shapiro, Beth and Nielsen, Rasmus and Zhang, Ya-Ping and Wu, Dong-Dong, Ancient Hybridization with Unknown Population Facilitated High Altitude Adaptation of Canids (September 19, 2019). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3456297 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3456297
This version of the paper has not been formally peer reviewed.

Ming-Shan Wang

Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) - State Key Laboratory of Genetic Resources and Evolution ( email )

No.32 Jiaochang Donglu
Kunming, Yunnan 650223
China

University of California, Santa Cruz - Howard Hughes Medical Institute ( email )

Santa Cruz, CA 95604
United States

Sheng Wang

Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) - State Key Laboratory of Genetic Resources and Evolution

No.32 Jiaochang Donglu
Kunming, Yunnan 650223
China

Yan Li

Yunnan University - State Key Laboratory for Conservation and Utilization of Bio-resource

China

Yadvendradev Jhala

Wildlife Institute of India ( email )

India

Mukesh Thakur

Wildlife Institute of India ( email )

India

Newton Otecko

Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) - State Key Laboratory of Genetic Resources and Evolution ( email )

No.32 Jiaochang Donglu
Kunming, Yunnan 650223
China

Jing-Fang Si

China Agricultural University - Laboratory of Animal Genetics, Breeding and Reproduction ( email )

China

Hong-Man Chen

Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) - State Key Laboratory of Genetic Resources and Evolution ( email )

No.32 Jiaochang Donglu
Kunming, Yunnan 650223
China

Beth Shapiro

University of California, Santa Cruz - Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Santa Cruz, CA 95604
United States

Rasmus Nielsen

University of Copenhagen - Centre for GeoGenetics ( email )

Ă˜ster Voldgade 5-7
Copenhagen, 1350
Denmark

Ya-Ping Zhang

Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) - State Key Laboratory of Genetic Resources and Evolution ( email )

No.32 Jiaochang Donglu
Kunming, Yunnan 650223
China

Dong-Dong Wu (Contact Author)

Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) - State Key Laboratory of Genetic Resources and Evolution ( email )

No.32 Jiaochang Donglu
Kunming, Yunnan 650223
China

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