Introduction to the West Virginia Law Review Flawed Forensics and Innocence Symposium

4 Pages Posted: 2 Oct 2019

See all articles by Valena Elizabeth Beety

Valena Elizabeth Beety

Arizona State University (ASU) - Sandra Day O'Connor College of Law

Date Written: November 17, 2016

Abstract

A chimera is the unique situation where the DNA of multiple people is collected in a single human being — twins joined together in the womb, for example. Such an anomaly is as likely as a convention of the best-known experts in both forensics and law to discuss ideas, setbacks, and advancements in the field of legal forensics. In Appalachia. In the winter. Indeed, the collection of scholars in both disciplines together, in a single locale anywhere, anytime, is rare.

While legal scholars and forensics experts frequently identify similar challenges and problems in the field, we generally examine those issues — and their potential solutions — in our own disciplinary silos. Unfortunately, the lack of a common gathering of both legal and forensics experts interested in changing the use of courtroom forensics impedes a more collaborative approach. The West Virginia Law Review’s symposium, “Flawed Forensics and Innocence,” provided us an opportunity to take a different tack.

Keywords: forensics, evidence, criminal, justice, legal, science, innocence

Suggested Citation

Beety, Valena Elizabeth, Introduction to the West Virginia Law Review Flawed Forensics and Innocence Symposium (November 17, 2016). West Virginia Law Review, Vol. 119, No. 101, 2016, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3457977

Valena Elizabeth Beety (Contact Author)

Arizona State University (ASU) - Sandra Day O'Connor College of Law ( email )

Box 877906
Tempe, AZ 85287-7906
United States

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