Causal Mechanisms in Policy Process Research: Are We Taking Them Seriously? Should We?

Making Policies Work: First-and Second-order Mechanisms in Policy Design, 2019

22 Pages Posted: 17 Oct 2019

See all articles by Evert Lindquist

Evert Lindquist

University of Victoria

Adam Wellstead

Michigan Technological University

Date Written: March 2017

Abstract

For nearly 20 years, the four edited volumes of Theories of the Policy Process (TPP) have reviewed and chronicled the key frameworks and theories of the policy process. With the growing sophistication and the ever increasing number of empirical applications of each approach, the volume’s editors have called for policy process scholars to take causality seriously. We argue that the growing interest in causal mechanisms in other areas of political sciences and in social sciences generally may contribute to the next generation of policy process research. A textual analysis of TPP’s 4th edition reveals a ‘lumpiness’ in the use of causality and mechanisms across seven popular approaches: the Multiple Streams Approach, the Advocacy Coalition Framework, Punctuated Equilibrium Theory, Institutional Analysis and Design, Policy Diffusion, Policy Feedback Theory, and Narrative Framework Theory.

Keywords: mechanisms, policy process frameworks, causality

Suggested Citation

Lindquist, Evert and Wellstead, Adam, Causal Mechanisms in Policy Process Research: Are We Taking Them Seriously? Should We? (March 2017). Making Policies Work: First-and Second-order Mechanisms in Policy Design, 2019. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3465947 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3465947

Evert Lindquist

University of Victoria

3800 Finnerty Road
Victoria, British Columbia V8P 5C2
Canada

Adam Wellstead (Contact Author)

Michigan Technological University ( email )

Department of Social Sciences
Houghton, MI 49931
United States

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