The UN Security Council in the Post-Cold War World, 1987-97

Security Dialogue, Vol. 28, No. 4, December 1997, pp. 393-404

Posted: 21 Oct 2019

Multiple version iconThere are 2 versions of this paper

Date Written: December 1, 1997

Abstract

The UN Security Council (UNSC) has experienced significant changes since the end of the Cold War. This article surveys key shifts in UNSC, mandates and activities between 1987 and 1997, nearly all of which stem from the twin phenomena of greater cooperation among the Permanent Five members (P-5) of the Council and from the Council's growing focus on civil wars and intercommunal strife, which has launched the Council into new and largely untested waters. It argues that Council decisions since 1987 have profound significance for, and have enhanced the Council's role in, international relations despite several spectacular setbacks, notably in Bosnia and Somalia. These decisions have eroded and redefined the concept of sovereignty.

Keywords: Peace keeping forces, Sovereignty, Councils, Peace keeping, Nonaligned states, Military alliances, Armed conflict, Economic sanctions, Cold wars

Suggested Citation

Malone, David M., The UN Security Council in the Post-Cold War World, 1987-97 (December 1, 1997). Security Dialogue, Vol. 28, No. 4, December 1997, pp. 393-404, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3467330

David M. Malone (Contact Author)

UN University ( email )

Tokyo, 150-8925
Japan
81-3-5467-1224 (Phone)
81-3-3499-2810 (Fax)

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