Household Labor Search, Spousal Insurance, and Health Care Reform

69 Pages Posted: 17 Oct 2019

See all articles by Hanming Fang

Hanming Fang

University of Pennsylvania - Department of Economics; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Andrew J. Shephard

University of Pennsylvania - Department of Economics

Multiple version iconThere are 3 versions of this paper

Date Written: October 14, 2019

Abstract

Health insurance in the United States for the working age population has traditionally been provided in the form of employer-sponsored health insurance (ESHI). If employers offered ESHI to their employees, they also typically extended coverage to their spouse and dependents. Provisions in the Affordable Care Act (ACA) significantly alter the incentive for firms to offer insurance to the spouses of employees. We evaluate the long-run impact of the ACA on firms’ insurance offerings and on household outcomes by developing and estimating an equilibrium job search model in which multiple household members are searching for jobs. The distribution of job offers is determined endogenously, with compensation packages consisting of a wage and menu of insurance offerings (premiums and coverage) that workers select from. Using our estimated model we find that households’ valuation of employer-sponsored spousal health insurance is significantly reduced under the ACA, and with an “employee-only” health insurance contract emerging among low productivity firms. We re-late these outcomes to the specific provisions in the ACA.

Keywords: Health, Health Insurance, Labor Market Equilibrium, Household Search

JEL Classification: G22, I11, I13, J32

Suggested Citation

Fang, Hanming and Shephard, Andrew J., Household Labor Search, Spousal Insurance, and Health Care Reform (October 14, 2019). PIER Working Paper No. 19-019 . Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3470737 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3470737

Hanming Fang

University of Pennsylvania - Department of Economics ( email )

Ronald O. Perelman Center for Political Science
133 South 36th Street
Philadelphia, PA 19104-6297
United States

National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

Andrew J. Shephard (Contact Author)

University of Pennsylvania - Department of Economics ( email )

Ronald O. Perelman Center for Political Science
133 South 36th Street
Philadelphia, PA 19104-6297
United States

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