Land-Management Options for Greenhouse Gas Removal and Their Impacts on Ecosystem Services and the Sustainable Development Goals

Posted: 23 Oct 2019

See all articles by Pete Smith

Pete Smith

University of Aberdeen

Justin Adams

World Economic Forum

David Beerling

University of Sheffield - Department of Animal and Plant Sciences

Tim Beringer

Humboldt University of Berlin

Katherine Calvin

Joint Global Change Research Institute

Sabine Fuss

Mercator Research Institute on Global Commons and Climate Change (MCC); International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA)

Bronson Griscom

The Nature Conservancy

Nikolas Hagemann

Ithaka Institute gGmbH

Claudia Kammann

Hochschule Nürtingen-Geislingen

Florian Kraxner

International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA)

Jan Minx

Technische Universität Berlin (TU Berlin)

Alexander Popp

Potsdam-Institut für Klimafolgenforschung (PIK)

Phil Renforth

Cardiff University

Jose Luis Vicente Vicente

Mercator Research Institute on Global Commons and Climate Change (MCC)

Saskia Keesstra

Wageningen UR - Environmental Systems Analysis Group

Date Written: October 2019

Abstract

Land-management options for greenhouse gas removal (GGR) include afforestation or reforestation (AR), wetland restoration, soil carbon sequestration (SCS), biochar, terrestrial enhanced weathering (TEW), and bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS). We assess the opportunities and risks associated with these options through the lens of their potential impacts on ecosystem services (Nature's Contributions to People; NCPs) and the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). We find that all land-based GGR options contribute positively to at least some NCPs and SDGs. Wetland restoration and SCS almost exclusively deliver positive impacts. A few GGR options, such as afforestation, BECCS, and biochar potentially impact negatively some NCPs and SDGs, particularly when implemented at scale, largely through competition for land. For those that present risks or are least understood, more research is required, and demonstration projects need to proceed with caution. For options that present low risks and provide cobenefits, implementation can proceed more rapidly following no-regrets principles.

Suggested Citation

Smith, Pete and Adams, Justin and Beerling, David and Beringer, Tim and Calvin, Katherine and Fuss, Sabine and Griscom, Bronson and Hagemann, Nikolas and Kammann, Claudia and Kraxner, Florian and Minx, Jan and Popp, Alexander and Renforth, Phil and Vicente Vicente, Jose Luis and Keesstra, Saskia, Land-Management Options for Greenhouse Gas Removal and Their Impacts on Ecosystem Services and the Sustainable Development Goals (October 2019). Annual Review of Environment and Resources, Vol. 44, pp. 255-286, 2019, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3472225 or http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-environ-101718-033129

Pete Smith (Contact Author)

University of Aberdeen ( email )

Dunbar Street
Aberdeen, Scotland AB24 3QY
United Kingdom

Justin Adams

World Economic Forum ( email )

CH - 1223 Cologny/Geneva
United States

David Beerling

University of Sheffield - Department of Animal and Plant Sciences ( email )

Sheffield, South Yorkshire S10 2TN
United Kingdom

Tim Beringer

Humboldt University of Berlin

Unter den Linden 6
Berlin, AK Berlin 10099
Germany

Katherine Calvin

Joint Global Change Research Institute ( email )

5825 University Research Court, Suite 3500
College Park, MD 20740
United States

Sabine Fuss

Mercator Research Institute on Global Commons and Climate Change (MCC) ( email )

Torgauer Straße 12-15
Berlin, 10829
Germany
49303385537224 (Phone)
303385537224 (Fax)

HOME PAGE: http://www.mcc-berlin.net

International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA) ( email )

Schlossplatz 1
Laxenburg, 2361
Austria

HOME PAGE: http://www.iiasa.ac.at

Bronson Griscom

The Nature Conservancy

Arlington, VA 22203-1637
United States

Nikolas Hagemann

Ithaka Institute gGmbH

Freiburg, 79106
Germany

Claudia Kammann

Hochschule Nürtingen-Geislingen

Nürtingen-Geislingen
Germany

Florian Kraxner

International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA)

Schlossplatz 1
Laxenburg, A-2361
Austria

Jan Minx

Technische Universität Berlin (TU Berlin) ( email )

Straße des 17
Juni 135
Berlin, 10623
Germany

Alexander Popp

Potsdam-Institut für Klimafolgenforschung (PIK)

Telegrafenberg 31
Potsdam, Brandenburg 14473
Germany

Phil Renforth

Cardiff University

Aberconway Building
Colum Drive
Cardiff, Wales CF10 3EU
United Kingdom

Jose Luis Vicente Vicente

Mercator Research Institute on Global Commons and Climate Change (MCC)

Torgauer Straße 12-15
Berlin, 10829
Germany

Saskia Keesstra

Wageningen UR - Environmental Systems Analysis Group

Droevendaalsesteeg 3
Wageningen, 6708 PB
Netherlands

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