Chapter 10: Peace Through International Adjudication: The Permanent Court of International Justice and the Post-War Order

In: Erpelding, M., Hess, B. and Ruiz Fabri, H. (eds.) Peace Through Law: The Versailles Peace Treaty and Dispute Settlement After World War I. Series: Studies of the Max Planck Institute Luxembourg for International, European and Regulatory Procedural Law (16). Nomos, pp. 217-237 (2019)

21 Pages Posted: 12 Nov 2019

See all articles by Christian J. Tams

Christian J. Tams

University of Glasgow, School of Law

Date Written: June 30, 2019

Abstract

That peace should be sought ‘through law’ is one of international law’s prominent themes. Over the centuries, the theme has been varied significantly. The post-WWI variation of the theme stands out as a particularly ambitious one. Just as after earlier upheavals, peace was sought through international treaties and territorial re-ordering. But not all was déjà vu; much was not in fact. Breaking with precedent, the task of preserving international peace and security was entrusted to a World Organization, the League of Nations.1 And as part of the move to international institutions, the World Organization was quickly supplemented by a World Court, the Permanent Court of International Justice (PCIJ). This contributions assesses the second of these innovations, by offering a bird’s eye view on the role of the World Court in the post-WW1 attempt to ensure peace through law. The argument proceeds in two steps: (i) it revisits the circumstances of the PCIJ’s creation, and (ii) outlines the experience of the court, once created.

Keywords: dispute settlement, international courts, world court, Permanent Court of International Justice, The Hague, peace through law, international law, World War 1

Suggested Citation

Tams, Christian J., Chapter 10: Peace Through International Adjudication: The Permanent Court of International Justice and the Post-War Order (June 30, 2019). In: Erpelding, M., Hess, B. and Ruiz Fabri, H. (eds.) Peace Through Law: The Versailles Peace Treaty and Dispute Settlement After World War I. Series: Studies of the Max Planck Institute Luxembourg for International, European and Regulatory Procedural Law (16). Nomos, pp. 217-237 (2019), Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3477826

Christian J. Tams (Contact Author)

University of Glasgow, School of Law ( email )

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HOME PAGE: http://www.gla.ac.uk/schools/law/staff/christiantams/

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