Elected Member Influence in the United Nations Security Council

Leiden Journal of International Law (Forthcoming)

ANU College of Law Research Paper No. 19.29

37 Pages Posted: 19 Nov 2019

See all articles by Jeremy Farrall

Jeremy Farrall

ANU College of Law

Marie-Eve Loiselle

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Christopher Michaelsen

University of New South Wales (UNSW) - Faculty of Law

Jochen Prantl

National University of Singapore (NUS)

Jeni Whalan

Paul Ramsay Foundation

Date Written: March 17, 2019

Abstract

This article reassesses how members of the UN Security Council exercise influence over the Council’s decision-making process, with particular focus on the ten elected members (the ‘E10’). A common understanding of Security Council dynamics accords predominance to the five permanent members (the ‘P5’), suggesting bleak prospects for the Council as a forum that promotes the voices and representation of the 188 non-permanent members. The assumption is that real power rests with the P5, while the E10 are there to make up the numbers. By articulating a richer account of Council dynamics, this article contests the conventional wisdom that P5 centrality crowds out space for the E10 to influence Council decision-making. It also shows that opportunities for influencing Council decision-making go beyond stints of elected membership. It argues that the assumed centrality of the P5 on the Council thus needs to be qualified and re-evaluated.

Keywords: United Nations, Security Council, UN Charter, influence, reform, decision-making

Suggested Citation

Farrall, Jeremy Matam and Loiselle, Marie-Eve and Michaelsen, Christopher and Prantl, Jochen and Whalan, Jeni, Elected Member Influence in the United Nations Security Council (March 17, 2019). Leiden Journal of International Law (Forthcoming), ANU College of Law Research Paper No. 19.29, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3488824

Jeremy Matam Farrall (Contact Author)

ANU College of Law ( email )

Canberra, Australian Capital Territory 0200
Australia

Marie-Eve Loiselle

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Christopher Michaelsen

University of New South Wales (UNSW) - Faculty of Law ( email )

Kensington, New South Wales 2052
Australia

Jochen Prantl

National University of Singapore (NUS) ( email )

1E Kent Ridge Road
NUHS Tower Block Level 7
Singapore, 119228
Singapore

Jeni Whalan

Paul Ramsay Foundation ( email )

Sydney
Australia

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