Elected Member Influence in the United Nations Security Council

Leiden Journal of International Law (Forthcoming)

ANU College of Law Research Paper No. 19.29

37 Pages Posted: 19 Nov 2019

See all articles by Jeremy Farrall

Jeremy Farrall

ANU College of Law

Marie-Eve Loiselle

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Christopher Michaelsen

University of New South Wales (UNSW) - Faculty of Law

Jochen Prantl

National University of Singapore (NUS)

Jeni Whalan

Paul Ramsay Foundation

Date Written: March 17, 2019

Abstract

This article reassesses how members of the UN Security Council exercise influence over the Council’s decision-making process, with particular focus on the ten elected members (the ‘E10’). A common understanding of Security Council dynamics accords predominance to the five permanent members (the ‘P5’), suggesting bleak prospects for the Council as a forum that promotes the voices and representation of the 188 non-permanent members. The assumption is that real power rests with the P5, while the E10 are there to make up the numbers. By articulating a richer account of Council dynamics, this article contests the conventional wisdom that P5 centrality crowds out space for the E10 to influence Council decision-making. It also shows that opportunities for influencing Council decision-making go beyond stints of elected membership. It argues that the assumed centrality of the P5 on the Council thus needs to be qualified and re-evaluated.

Keywords: United Nations, Security Council, UN Charter, influence, reform, decision-making

Suggested Citation

Farrall, Jeremy Matam and Loiselle, Marie-Eve and Michaelsen, Christopher and Prantl, Jochen and Whalan, Jeni, Elected Member Influence in the United Nations Security Council (March 17, 2019). Leiden Journal of International Law (Forthcoming); ANU College of Law Research Paper No. 19.29. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3488824

Jeremy Matam Farrall (Contact Author)

ANU College of Law ( email )

Canberra, Australian Capital Territory 0200
Australia

Marie-Eve Loiselle

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Christopher Michaelsen

University of New South Wales (UNSW) - Faculty of Law ( email )

Kensington, New South Wales 2052
Australia

Jochen Prantl

National University of Singapore (NUS) ( email )

1E Kent Ridge Road
NUHS Tower Block Level 7
Singapore, 119228
Singapore

Jeni Whalan

Paul Ramsay Foundation ( email )

Sydney
Australia

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