A Meta-Analysis of Technology Interventions in Collegiate Economics Classes

Journal of Economic Education, 52 (1): 1 - 16 https://doi.org/10.1080/00220485.2020.1845261

27 Pages Posted: 31 Dec 2019 Last revised: 31 Mar 2021

See all articles by Marianne Johnson

Marianne Johnson

University of Wisconsin - Oshkosh - Department of Economics

Martin Meder

Nicholls State University - College of Business Administration

Date Written: December 9, 2020

Abstract

Technological interventions in and out of the classroom have been sold as a way to improve student understanding of economics for decades. Yet despite the panoply of ways to incorporate technology, it is not clear which types of interventions consistently result in statistically significant improvements in learning outcomes. Of 145 papers devoted to the technology in collegiate economics courses over the past 30 years, less than one third attempt to quantitatively assess the impact of technology on student learning outcomes. Of the regressions reported in these studies, 60 percent find a positive relationship between a technology intervention and a student-learning outcome; however, in only 42 percent of the regressions is the relationship statistically significant. Considering the literature with meta regression analysis suggests (a) no technology intervention routinely results in improved learning outcomes across studies; this is despite evidence of (b) publication bias that favors papers with statistically significant results. We conclude that success improving student-learning outcomes with technology interventions is highly individual. As a field, economics needs more well-designed, large-scale studies of technology interventions.

Keywords: Technology, Computers, College Classrooms, Universities, Economics Education

JEL Classification: A22, I23

Suggested Citation

Johnson, Marianne and Meder, Martin, A Meta-Analysis of Technology Interventions in Collegiate Economics Classes (December 9, 2020). Journal of Economic Education, 52 (1): 1 - 16 https://doi.org/10.1080/00220485.2020.1845261, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3501227 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3501227

Marianne Johnson (Contact Author)

University of Wisconsin - Oshkosh - Department of Economics ( email )

800 Algoma Blvd.
Oshkosh, WI 54901
United States
920-424-2230 (Phone)
920-424-1734 (Fax)

Martin Meder

Nicholls State University - College of Business Administration ( email )

Thibodaux, LA
United States

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