Open government and innovation for inclusive development: Competing values in policy development, co-creation, brokering and procurement

24 Pages Posted: 31 Dec 2019 Last revised: 17 Jul 2020

See all articles by Paul Plantinga

Paul Plantinga

Human Sciences Research Council (HSRC)

Rachel Adams

Information Law and Policy Centre, Institute for Advanced Legal Studies; Research Use and Impact Assessment, Human Sciences Research Council

Date Written: August 20, 2019

Abstract

The opening of government in a number of countries has implications for innovation processes and the potential for inclusive development outcomes. After unpacking some of the key thinking around openness proffered by Karl Popper and others, we explore the adoption of open government practices in innovation by considering four important instruments: the opening of innovation and technology policy processes, co-creation and collaborative solution development by civil servants, government entities acting as innovation brokers, and public sector procurement of innovation. Through a case study of South Africa, we highlight how innovation actors prioritise particular values of openness over others. For example, in pushing for more open interaction between state and non-state actors as a more effective way of addressing social challenges, values of legality and impartiality are often minimised. This oversight leads to project failures, legitimacy crises and exploitation of relationships by powerful entities. In response, we suggest that public sector innovation programmes and platforms can more explicitly recognise different values, especially from emergent grassroots innovation networks, and thereby enable sustainable application of open government practices.

Keywords: Innovation, inclusive development, open government, procurement, co-creation, South Africa

Suggested Citation

Plantinga, Paul and Adams, Rachel, Open government and innovation for inclusive development: Competing values in policy development, co-creation, brokering and procurement (August 20, 2019). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3501484 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3501484

Paul Plantinga (Contact Author)

Human Sciences Research Council (HSRC) ( email )

Private Bag X41
134 Pretorius Street
Pretoria, 0001
South Africa

Rachel Adams

Information Law and Policy Centre, Institute for Advanced Legal Studies ( email )

Charles Clore House
17 Russell Square
London, WC1B 5DR
United Kingdom

Research Use and Impact Assessment, Human Sciences Research Council ( email )

Private Bag X41
134 Pretorius Street
Pretoria, 0001
South Africa

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