Settlement Location Shapes Refugee Integration: Evidence from Post-War Germany

54 Pages Posted: 17 Dec 2019

See all articles by Sebastian Braun

Sebastian Braun

Independent

Nadja Dwenger

Max Planck Institute for Tax Law and Public Finance

Multiple version iconThere are 2 versions of this paper

Date Written: December 2019

Abstract

Following one of the largest displacements in human history, almost eight million forced migrants arrived in West Germany after WWII. We study empirically how the settlement location of migrants affected their economic, social and political integration in West Germany. We first document large differences in integration outcomes across West German counties. We then show that high inflows of migrants and a large agrarian base hampered integration. Religious differences between migrants and natives had no effect on economic integration. Yet, they decreased intermarriage rates and strengthened anti-migrant parties. Based on our estimates, we simulate the regional distribution of migrants that maximizes their labor force participation. Inner-German migration in the 1950s brought the actual distribution closer to its optimum.

Keywords: Forced Migration, Post-War Germany, Regional Integration

JEL Classification: J15, J61, N34

Suggested Citation

Braun, Sebastian and Dwenger, Nadja, Settlement Location Shapes Refugee Integration: Evidence from Post-War Germany (December 2019). CEPR Discussion Paper No. DP14194, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3504624

Nadja Dwenger

Max Planck Institute for Tax Law and Public Finance ( email )

10117
Germany

HOME PAGE: http://www.tax.mpg.de/en/pub/public_economics/public_economics_people/dwenger_nadja.cfm

Do you have a job opening that you would like to promote on SSRN?

Paper statistics

Downloads
0
Abstract Views
107
PlumX Metrics