IFAD RESEARCH SERIES 44 Gender, Rural Youth and Structural Transformation: Evidence to Inform Innovative Youth Programming

64 Pages Posted: 10 Feb 2020 Last revised: 6 Apr 2020

See all articles by Cheryl R. Doss

Cheryl R. Doss

University of Oxford - Department of International Development

Jessica Heckert

International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI)

Emily Myers

International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI)

Audrey Pereira

IFPRI’s Poverty, Health, and Nutrition Division

Agnes Quisumbing

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Date Written: January 16, 2020

Abstract

The transition to adulthood is marked by interrelated changes in the areas of education, employment and family formation. Using frameworks on gendered transitions to adulthood and links between assets and livelihoods, we analyse nationally representative, sex-disaggregated data from 42 countries to characterize rural youths’ transition to adulthood by gender and according to a four-category typology of low and high levels of structural and rural transformation. Overall, we find that young women and men experience the transition to adulthood differently according to the structural and rural transformation classification of the countries where they live. Across all structural and rural transformation categories, young women are more likely to be married and living with their spouses or in-laws, less likely to be in school or employed, and less likely to own land solely. Gender gaps in secondary school education favour young women only in countries with higher levels of structural and rural transformation, and favour young men in the other three categories. Moreover, a larger proportion of young women than young men are not in education, employment, or training (NEET), but many NEET youth, especially young women, have transitioned into domestic and reproductive roles (i.e. are more likely to be married and/or have children.) Additionally, we review impact evaluations of interventions targeting youth. We find limited evidence on the gendered impacts of such programmes, and these programmes seldom consider how constraints differ for young men and young women. Addressing gaps in programmes and building an evidence base on the gendered impact of interventions can provide insights into how gender roles can simultaneously limit options and offer opportunities to young rural women and men in the context of structural and rural transformation.

Suggested Citation

Doss, Cheryl R. and Heckert, Jessica and Myers, Emily and Pereira, Audrey and Quisumbing, Agnes, IFAD RESEARCH SERIES 44 Gender, Rural Youth and Structural Transformation: Evidence to Inform Innovative Youth Programming (January 16, 2020). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3520616 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3520616

Cheryl R. Doss (Contact Author)

University of Oxford - Department of International Development ( email )

3 Mansfield Road
Oxford, OX1 3TB
United Kingdom

Jessica Heckert

International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) ( email )

1201 Eye St, NW,
Washington, DC 20005
United States

Emily Myers

International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) ( email )

1201 Eye St, NW,
Washington, DC 20005
United States

Audrey Pereira

IFPRI’s Poverty, Health, and Nutrition Division ( email )

1201 Eye St, NW,
Washington, DC 20005
United States

Agnes Quisumbing

affiliation not provided to SSRN

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