Youth Treatment Orders Bill Highlights Ad Hoc Approach to Rights Scrutiny of Bills

Law Society Bulletin VOLUME 41 – ISSUE 4 – MAY 2019 p. 36-38

U. of Adelaide Law Research Paper No. 2020-20

Posted: 21 Feb 2020

See all articles by Laura Grenfell

Laura Grenfell

University of Adelaide

Sarah Moulds

University of South Australia - School of Law; University of Adelaide, School of Law

Multiple version iconThere are 2 versions of this paper

Date Written: February 20, 2020

Abstract

South Australia’s Parliament has no formalised parliamentary system of rights scrutiny for bills. Instead, it relies on a network of subject-specific Standing, Select, Sessional and Joint Committees, and draws upon an ad hoc system of external rights scrutiny, often under taken by bodies like the Law Society. While these bodies can produce thoughtful, persuasive submissions, the impact of such extraparliamentary scrutiny can be limited by political factors, and particularly by timing. This means that the community more broadly is often shut out of the law-making process or left wondering how best to draw Parliament’s attention to a problematic law.

Keywords: Bills, South Australia's Parliament

JEL Classification: K10

Suggested Citation

Grenfell, Laura and Moulds, Sarah, Youth Treatment Orders Bill Highlights Ad Hoc Approach to Rights Scrutiny of Bills (February 20, 2020). Law Society Bulletin VOLUME 41 – ISSUE 4 – MAY 2019 p. 36-38, U. of Adelaide Law Research Paper No. 2020-20, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3542008

Laura Grenfell (Contact Author)

University of Adelaide

No 233 North Terrace, School of Commerce
Adelaide, South Australia 5005
Australia

Sarah Moulds

University of South Australia - School of Law ( email )

GPO Box 2471
Adelaide SA 5001
Australia

University of Adelaide, School of Law ( email )

Adelaide
Australia

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