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An Autoregulatory Mechanism Maintains Proper Levels of 22G-siRNA in C. Elegans

28 Pages Posted: 7 Apr 2020 Sneak Peek Status: Review Complete

See all articles by Alicia K. Rogers

Alicia K. Rogers

University of Southern California - Department of Biological Sciences

Carolyn M. Phillips

University of Southern California - Department of Biological Sciences

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Abstract

RNA interference (RNAi) is an essential regulatory mechanism in all animals. In C. elegans, several classes of small RNAs act to silence or license expression of mRNA targets. ERI-6/7 is required for the production of some endogenous siRNAs and acts as a negative regulator of the exogenous RNAi pathway. We found that the genomic locus encoding eri-6/7 contains two distinct regions that are targeted by endogenous siRNAs. Loss of these siRNAs disrupts eri-6/7 mRNA expression, resulting in increased production of siRNAs from other small RNA pathways because these pathways compete with eri-6/7-dependent transcripts for access to the downstream siRNA amplification machinery. Thus, the pathway acts like a negative feedback loop, to ensure homeostasis of gene expression by small RNA pathways. Similar feedback loops that maintain chromatin homeostasis have been identified in yeast and Drosophila melanogaster, suggesting an evolutionary conservation of autoregulatory mechanisms in gene regulatory pathways.

Keywords: RNAi, C. elegans, Small RNA, autoregulatory, feedback loop, 22G-siRNAs

Suggested Citation

Rogers, Alicia K. and Phillips, Carolyn M., An Autoregulatory Mechanism Maintains Proper Levels of 22G-siRNA in C. Elegans. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3564988 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3564988
This is a paper under consideration at Cell Press and has not been peer-reviewed.

Alicia K. Rogers

University of Southern California - Department of Biological Sciences

3616 Trousdale Parkway, AHF 107
Los Angeles, CA 90089-0371
United States

Carolyn M. Phillips (Contact Author)

University of Southern California - Department of Biological Sciences ( email )

3616 Trousdale Parkway, AHF 107
Los Angeles, CA 90089-0371
United States

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