Collective Intelligence at EU Level - Social and Democratic Dimensions

European Parliamentary Research Service, 2020

11 Pages Posted: 1 Apr 2020

See all articles by Nora Milotay

Nora Milotay

European Parliamentary Research Service

Gianluca Sgueo

European Parliamentary Research Service; Center for Social Studies - University of Coimbra; New York University

Date Written: April 1, 2020

Abstract

Humans are among the many living species capable of collaborative and imaginative thinking. While it is widely agreed among scholars that this capacity has contributed to making humans the dominant species, other crucial questions remain open to debate. Is it possible to encourage large groups of people to engage in collective thinking? Is it possible to coordinate citizens to find solutions to address global challenges? Some scholars claim that large groups of independent, motivated, and well-informed people can, collectively, make better decisions than isolated individuals can – what is known as 'collective intelligence.'

The social dimension of collective intelligence mainly relates to social aspects of the economy and of innovation. It shows that a holistic approach to innovation – one that includes not only technological but also social aspects – can greatly contribute to the EU's goal of promoting a just transition for everyone to a sustainable and green economy in the digital age. The EU has been taking concrete action to promote social innovation by supporting the development of its theory and practice. Mainly through funding programmes, it helps to seek new types of partners and build new capacity – and thus shape the future of local and national innovations aimed at societal needs.

The democratic dimension suggests that the power of the collective can be leveraged so as to improve public decision-making systems. Supported by technology, policy-makers can harness the 'civic surplus' of citizens – thus providing smarter solutions to regulatory challenges. This is particularly relevant at EU level in view of the planned Conference on the Future of Europe, aimed at engaging communities at large and making EU decision-making more inclusive and participatory.

The current coronavirus crisis is likely to change society and our economy in ways as yet too early to predict, but recovery after the crisis will require new ways of thinking and acting to overcome common challenges, and thus making use of our collective intelligence should be more urgent than ever. In the longer term, in order to mobilise collective intelligence across the EU and to fully exploit its innovative potential, the EU needs to strengthen its education policies and promote a shared understanding of a holistic approach to innovation and of collective intelligence – and thus become a 'global brain,' with a solid institutional set-up at the centre of a subsidised experimentation process that meets the challenges imposed by modernday transformations.

Keywords: collective intelligence, governance, public sector, innovation, democracy, policy-making, european union, crowdsourcing, civic surplus, technology, digital

Suggested Citation

Milotay, Nora and Sgueo, Gianluca, Collective Intelligence at EU Level - Social and Democratic Dimensions (April 1, 2020). European Parliamentary Research Service, 2020 . Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3565944

Nora Milotay

European Parliamentary Research Service ( email )

Brussels
Belgium

Gianluca Sgueo (Contact Author)

European Parliamentary Research Service ( email )

Bât. Altiero Spinelli
60 rue Wiertz / Wiertzstraat 60
Brussels, B-1047
Belgium

Center for Social Studies - University of Coimbra ( email )

Apartado 3008
Coimbra, 3001-454
Portugal

HOME PAGE: http://www.gianlucasgueo.com

New York University ( email )

Via Bolognese 120
Florence, Florence 50139
Italy

HOME PAGE: http://www.gianlucasgueo.it

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