Political Beliefs affect Compliance with Government Mandates

43 Pages Posted: 6 Apr 2020 Last revised: 17 Mar 2021

See all articles by Marcus Painter

Marcus Painter

Saint Louis University - Department of Finance

Tian Qiu

University of Alabama - Department of Economics, Finance and Legal Studies

Date Written: March 8, 2021

Abstract

We use the state-mandated stay-at-home orders during the coronavirus pandemic as a setting to study whether political beliefs inhibit compliance with government orders. Using geolocation data sourced from smartphones, we find residents in Republican counties are less likely to completely stay at home after a state order has been implemented relative to those
in Democratic counties. Debit card transaction data shows that Democrats are more likely to switch to remote spending after state orders are implemented. Heterogeneity in factors such as Covid-19 risk exposure, geography, and county characteristics do not completely rule out our findings, suggesting political beliefs are an important determinant in the effectiveness of government mandates. Political alignment with officials giving orders may partially explain
these partisan differences.

Keywords: COVID-19, Coronavirus, Political polarization, Geolocation data, Credit card transaction data

JEL Classification: P16, C55, H7

Suggested Citation

Painter, Marcus and Qiu, Tian, Political Beliefs affect Compliance with Government Mandates (March 8, 2021). Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization, Forthcoming, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3569098 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3569098

Marcus Painter (Contact Author)

Saint Louis University - Department of Finance ( email )

Saint Louis, MO
United States

Tian Qiu

University of Alabama - Department of Economics, Finance and Legal Studies ( email )

P.O. Box 870244
Tuscaloosa, AL 35487
United States

Do you have negative results from your research you’d like to share?

Paper statistics

Downloads
5,293
Abstract Views
26,578
Rank
2,998
PlumX Metrics