The Continuing Significance of Race: Official Legislative Racial Discrimination in Louisiana 1861 to 1974

66 Pages Posted: 16 Apr 2020 Last revised: 26 Jun 2020

See all articles by William P. Quigley

William P. Quigley

Loyola University New Orleans College of Law

Date Written: April 14, 2020

Abstract

This Article documents and analyzes official racial discrimination in legislation in Louisiana from the Civil War until the 1974 Louisiana Constitution. An earlier article chronicled the record of legislative racial discrimination in Louisiana from 1803 to 1865.

Whites lost the Civil War, yet were quickly able to recapture power in Louisiana for most of the following century by systematically denying African Americans the right to vote and enacting a comprehensive legal system of white supremacy.

One hundred twenty years after the Civil War ended, Louisiana laws finally, officially acknowledged equality. The journey of official laws has evolved from slavery to a brief few years of freedom, to decades of segregation, and, finally, to the modern, ongoing fight for civil rights.

This is the story of that journey.

Keywords: Louisiana, Civil War, Reconstruction Jim Crow Laws, racial discrimination, civil rights

Suggested Citation

Quigley, William P., The Continuing Significance of Race: Official Legislative Racial Discrimination in Louisiana 1861 to 1974 (April 14, 2020). 47 S.U. L. Rev. 1 (2019), Loyola University New Orleans College of Law Research Paper 2020-01, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3575898

William P. Quigley (Contact Author)

Loyola University New Orleans College of Law ( email )

7214 St. Charles Ave., Box 901
Campus Box 901
New Orleans, LA 70118
United States

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